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  • Dr. Scott Dust is an assistant professor of management at the Farmer School of Business at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, who writes extensively on business leadership.
  • Months into the pandemic, the advice to overcommunicate or schedule frequent check-ins is old news for employers leading remote teams — and more meaningful, long-term strategies are needed to help workers feel supported and motivated.
  • Leaders shouldn’t pressure employees to share their personal challenges unless they want to, and should record virtual meetings to make them available when it’s convenient for different workers to watch them. 
  • In new or uncertain environments, employees tend to mimic the behaviors of their leader, he writes.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A few years ago, just 2.5% of US employees worked from home. When the pandemic forced the closures of workplaces from coast to coast, this number peaked in June at 42%. Although this percentage

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owasso chamber

Brady Deaton, business developer at Paul David Restoration in Tulsa (left), and McKenzie Dildy, director of development for Arubah Community Clinic in Collinsville, met at the Owasso Chamber of Commerce’s Business Over Breakfast Tuesday morning. ART HADDAWAY/Owasso Reporter


Brady Deaton and McKenzie Dildy may live in different parts of Tulsa County, but they have Owasso to thank for their newfound friendship.

Deaton, business developer at Paul David Restoration in Tulsa, and Dildy, director of development for Arubah Community Clinic in Collinsville, met at the Owasso Chamber of Commerce’s Business Over Breakfast Tuesday morning.

The two were among over a dozen local business leaders to convene at Prosperity Bank off of 96th Street as part of the bimonthly event, with Tuesday serving as the Chamber’s first gathering since March due to COVID-19.

It was also Deaton’s and Dildy’s first time attending a Business Over Breakfast in Owasso, which gave them an

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VANCOUVER, BC / ACCESSWIRE / October 13, 2020 / By mid-April, roughly a month after the World Health Organization had officially declared COVID19 a global pandemic, Amazon reportedly hired an additional 175,000 employees to help deliver on a surging demand of online orders. This employment boom indicates that, unlike other industries, the eCommerce industry did not experience economic pain as a result of the pandemic, but quite the opposite.

This increase in online ordering created both a packaging graveyard bursting with delivery materials and a massive influx in carbon emissions resulting from transporting goods from point A to B. TreeEra, an industry-leading Canadian based organization focused on sustainability through community-funded tree planting, is providing a simple solution to this complicated problem with their recently launched program 1:Tree. 1:Tree allows businesses and individuals the option and opportunity to plant a tree with each good or service sold, offsetting the

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With international borders being closed for flyers for over seven months since the Covid-19 pandemic first spread across the world, global airlines and aircraft manufacturers are coming up with innovative ideas to keep themselves afloat financially and also stay alive in the minds of the flying public.

Qantas did a seven-hour flight from and to Sydney airport, with passengers being promised views of the Great Barrier Reef and the Australian Outback as the aircraft flew at a low altitude.

On a different trajectory, Thai Airways has opened a restaurant at its headquarters in Bangkok offering meals that it served on flights. The restaurant, which serves about 2,000 meals per day, is a way of recouping some lost revenue during the pandemic. Thai officials added that the airline was planning to turn other Thai Airways offices into similar dining experiences.

In addition, the media in Thailand reported that the airline has

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Allison Barr Allen is the Co-Founder and Chief Operating Officer at Fast, based in San Francisco.

As Covid-19 drove people into lockdown this year, it also drove them online in nearly every aspect of their lives. Entire companies relocated to Zoom. Doctors treated patients through computer screens, and e-commerce giants saw their profits soar. Meanwhile, small businesses, particularly those that depend on a physical presence to sell their products or services, have been hit hard. Just as online shopping went from a convenience to a necessity for consumers, digital channels have become a requirement for retailers of all types and sizes to survive. And even when the pandemic is over, there is ample evidence that customers will continue to shop online in ever-greater numbers.

While most retailers today have some kind of online presence, the world of e-commerce technology can be vast and confusing. It seems like it

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Founder and CEO of SmartFinancial.com: on a mission to make the insurance buying process more efficient.

It used to be that if you asked someone who they’re insured with, they’d give you their insurance agent’s name. Billions of dollars in advertising later, people now name their carrier and barely remember the agent that signed them on. Meanwhile, the brick and mortar agencies are waning in importance, and companies like Nationwide are moving to a virtual workforce model. In my role as a CEO overseeing an insurance-technology platform, I’ve observed one thing that remains the same despite all the confusing shifts over the past few decades: Insurance agents are still the primary sales channel for insurers.

Even though carriers can communicate directly with consumers at a lower cost, insurance agents who bring profitable business to carriers are a valued and integral part of the insurance distribution chain. Here’s how future

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It is estimated that by 2021 more than 50 percent of the U.S. population growth will be attributed to Hispanics based on a report from Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream. Today, youthful diversity is becoming the counterweight to white, aging consumers, and it is forcing brands to redefine themselves — to discover new market opportunities and develop more meaningful, culturally relevant customer experiences. 



a woman standing in front of a window


© Thomas Barwick | Getty Images


We live in a reactive society, not a proactive one, and Corporate America moves slowly. Sometimes, the procedures that companies have in place don’t allow them to react fast enough to market trends. It’s like the old motto that many executives cling to: “If it is not broken why fix it?”

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They think that if consumers want their products or services, they will buy them, and if not then so be it.

That outdated thinking won’t be sustainable moving forward,

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Watty Brooks Hall, the owner of the Brooks Collection, plans to keep her iPhone charged and ready for more FaceTime calls this holiday season.

Her Collierville, Tennessee gift shop introduced virtual shopping for consumers who don’t feel comfortable coming inside but want to see the pottery, gifts and home goods up close. Hall also plans to post more photos on Instagram and Facebook where engagement has been up since the pandemic.

Texas-based Stag Provisions also is engaging more with shoppers on social media. It will also stock more comfortable clothes such as t-shirts and sweatpants this holiday season as people continue to spend a lot of time at home. 

And Gibson’s Bookstore, New Hampshire’s oldest independent book shop established in 1898, hopes to drive online sales with its new curbside pickup option.

Small retailers across the country have had to get creative to keep the lights on after dealing with

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It’s one thing to start and launch a business. But identifying and optimizing a company’s growth potential is an entirely different matter. And it’s one that many entrepreneurs struggle with as their business takes off and as the business environment and consumer preferences evolve.



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© katleho Seisa | Getty Images


As I have developed my own business and watched those of my colleagues, there are many ways to figure out the best opportunities to expand and build your company. Here are my seven top tips for identifying and capitalizing on your business growth potential:

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1. Identify unmet customer needs

One of the best ways to uncover where your business has room to grow is to look at still unmet customer needs. I started my business that way, so it makes sense to continue employing that same strategy to find new growth opportunities. There are plenty of customer problems

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5 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


There may be something worse than poor customer service from a mega-company but, if there is, it hasn’t been discovered. You wait on hold listening to the elevator loop of “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” in hopes of telling your story from the beginning for the third time.

Too bad you were cut off. You can try again when the self-inflicted bald spots on the side of your head grow back.

In a recent Harvard Business Review article, Anthony Dukes and Yi Zhu shed light on hard evidence that, for some conglomerates, poor service is actually profitable. When the hassle and amount of time it takes to resolve issues outweigh the benefit, a percentage of customers give up, leaving the business to keep the difference.

In contrast, small businesses are not afforded this luxury. As learned entrepreneurs

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