The owner of a grocery store at the site of the George Floyd killing in Minneapolis, Minn., has threatened to sue the mayor and city council over the establishment of an “autonomous zone” that the owner says is hurting businesses in the area, KTSP News reported on Thursday.



a person standing in front of a store: A local resident stands in front of a makeshift memorial honoring George Floyd, at the spot where he was taken into custody, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, June 1, 2020.


© Carlos Barria/Reuters
A local resident stands in front of a makeshift memorial honoring George Floyd, at the spot where he was taken into custody, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, June 1, 2020.

Employees of the Cup Foods grocery store called police in May after Floyd allegedly attempted to use a counterfeit $20 bill during a purchase. The officers who responded have now been indicted for causing Floyd’s death. The killing sparked massive riots in the city during which arsonists destroyed businesses as well as the city’s third police precinct.

Activists have barricaded an area of several blocks around Cup Foods for several

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Tim Baylor, a former Vikings football player and Northside business owner, is moving forward with a $60 million project in north Minneapolis designed to bring a mix of market-rate and affordable apartments to W. Broadway.

Crews are expected to break ground by next spring on the Satori Village project, which falls in a federally designated Opportunity Zone, and includes 198 units of blended “market quality” and affordable apartments. Demolition for one of the existing buildings on the site will begin next month.

The combination of affordable and market-rate rental options is badly needed in north Minneapolis, said Baylor, chief executive of the JADT Development Group, which is developing the project.

Baylor noted that Minneapolis’ North Side absorbed more than 350 units of affordable housing in 10 years but developed no new market-rate apartments during the same period.

“Our perspective is that north Minneapolis needs more than just one kind of

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Minneapolis businesses are threatening to bring Mayor Jacob Frey to court over losing customers and income because of the protests and violence in the city.

Mark Thompson, an attorney representing the grocery store Cup Foods, and a number of other businesses, sent a letter obtained by Fox News threatening to sue Frey and the Minneapolis City Council. In letter, Thompson accused the city has acted negligently and caused businesses in the area to suffer damages. 

“My clients and I request a meeting with the mayor and all council members at their earliest convenience to discuss our concerns in greater detail and to see if we can come to some sort of agreement without initiating litigation,” Thompson wrote.

Cup Foods spokesperson Jamar Nelson told Fox News that the city has had barricades installed around the area since about May after Floyd died and protests flared that have deterred potential customers. 

“We’re

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It has been a struggle for Vanessa Ellis to do laundry since rioters wrecked the Giant Wash laundromat on W. Broadway in Minneapolis four months ago.

She paid a relative $20 to take her to another coin-operated laundromat miles away, but she hated the hassle. Every day, she would walk over to the Giant Wash to see if it had reopened yet.

Her persistence finally paid off last week, when she trudged through the door with two plastic bags bulging with dirty clothes. As she loaded five washing machines, Ellis thanked the attendant for bringing back an essential service for many low-income residents in the north Minneapolis neighborhood.

“I love it,” said a beaming Ellis, 60, who lives two blocks away and subsists on a disability income related to heart problems. “I’m going to be here all of the time. I’ll be glad when Walgreens and Family Dollar finally open

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MINNEAPOLIS — As Minneapolis businesses struggle to clear rubble from their store fronts, business owners are concerned the rioters might destroy what they’ve built for a second time if they rebuild.

Don Blyly, owner of Uncle Hugo’s Science Fiction Bookstore, just started demoing what’s still standing of his store and clearing the rubble.

But he says he may wait until after the trial of the four police officers charged with the death of George Floyd before rebuilding. “If the mob does not like the decision of the jury, we could have rioting again,” he said. “And I don’t want to be burned out a second time.”

MINNEAPOLIS CITY COUNCIL ALARMED BY SURGE IN CRIME MONTHS AFTER VOTING TO DEFUND THE POLICE

Blyly told Fox News his collection of over one hundred thousand rare sci-fi books, comics and magazines burned along with his decadeslong investment in the store. He estimates his

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MINNEAPOLIS —
It’s unusually quiet on what would normally be one of the busiest days of the year, with people outside tailgating in the surrounding parking lots near the U.S Bank Stadium in Downtown Minneapolis.

“In general, I would say Downtown just doesn’t have any traffic anymore, ever since March,” says Cindy Harrison, who owns Sawatdee Thai Restaurant.

Harrison owns Sawatdee Thai Restaurant, right across from the US Bank Stadium. Her family has been in business for more than thirty years, but she says this years’ Vikings season opener is out of the norm.

“Even on the cold days the Vikings fans are out tailgating, and obviously not today,” says Harrison.

The Vikings announced there will be no tailgating during the 2020 season – due to COVID-19. Harrison says it’s another blow for businesses struggling to survive. “We hope people will come. We have some outdoor seating and a really

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The owner of Lotus Restaurant had seen enough.



a group of people standing in front of a building: Workers board up Brit's Pub in downtown Minneapolis on Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020. Gov. Tim Walz mobilized the Minnesota National Guard on Wednesday night after people looted downtown Minneapolis businesses, in the wake of a homicide suspect fatally shooting himself. An overnight curfew was also ordered in the city. Police initially posted a graphic video, which showed the man's suicide, after a crowd gathered and believed it was the police who had killed the suspect, who was Black.(John Autey / Pioneer Press)


© Provided by Twin Cities Pioneer Press
Workers board up Brit’s Pub in downtown Minneapolis on Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020. Gov. Tim Walz mobilized the Minnesota National Guard on Wednesday night after people looted downtown Minneapolis businesses, in the wake of a homicide suspect fatally shooting himself. An overnight curfew was also ordered in the city. Police initially posted a graphic video, which showed the man’s suicide, after a crowd gathered and believed it was the police who had killed the suspect, who was Black.(John Autey / Pioneer Press)

Yoom Nguyen had watched Wednesday night as looters threw a rock and fire extinguisher to break into the family-owned business, which opened in 1984 at Grant Street and LaSalle Avenue in the Loring Park neighborhood of Minneapolis.

When Nguyen, who was outside, saw a young man throw a rock at a family photo

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After looters crashed through his floor-to-ceiling windows and stole $1 million worth of booze in May, Chicago-Lake Liquors owner John Wolf wanted to protect himself from a repeat occurrence.

Like property owners throughout the world, he wanted to install security shutters on the outside of his building. The investment would not only prevent rioters from entering his store, it would protect his windows — which cost $50,000 to replace.

But Wolf ran into a big obstacle: The City of Minneapolis has barred security shutters on building exteriors since 2004.

Unlike the City of St. Paul, which allows external shutters as long as owners request a permit, Minneapolis limits security shutters to the inside of a property, leaving windows vulnerable to attack. In a report justifying the rule change, Minneapolis officials argued that external shutters “cause visual blight” and create the impression that an area is “unsafe” and “troublesome.”

But in

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Minneapolis businessman John Wolf joined President Trump on Monday to talk about how one of his stores, Chicago Lake Liquors, was heavily damaged and looted during the height of the riots in May following the death of George Floyd.

The store has been at its location in south Minneapolis since 1959 and was targeted by looters starting on May 28. The looting went on for two more days. More than 300 businesses were destroyed during the riots. 

“I called 911 over 10 times, without any response, all while watching looters damage my building and haul away product. The feeling of hopelessness I had, knowing that no one was coming, is indescribable,” Wolf said on the airport tarmac.

“I faced three nights of looting, six fires, three feet of standing water, over a million dollars worth in stolen and damaged product. There’s nothing more important for elected officials than providing safety

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