Ana Solís sat down on the sidewalk to rest. After entering Guatemala on foot with thousands of Honduran migrants hoping to make it to the United States earlier this week, she slept beside a highway and then found rides to the capital.



a person riding on the back of a truck: Migrants ride on the back of a truck in Rio Dulce, Guatemala, on Friday. A new caravan of about 2,000 migrants set out from neighboring Honduras in hopes of reaching the United States. (Moises Castillo / Associated Press)


© Provided by The LA Times
Migrants ride on the back of a truck in Rio Dulce, Guatemala, on Friday. A new caravan of about 2,000 migrants set out from neighboring Honduras in hopes of reaching the United States. (Moises Castillo / Associated Press)

“There are no jobs,” she said outside a migrant shelter on Friday. “There is nothing to eat,” she said.

Solís, 26, said she lost her job last year. She worked in a banana packing plant in Bonito Oriental, in northeastern Honduras, but often earned less than minimum wage. Her partner tried to migrate north last year but was deported from Mexico.

This time

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  • The UK has deployed a military drone over the English Channel to monitor and stop migrants trying to cross from France, The Washington Post reported.
  • It’s the first time the Watchkeeper WK450 has been used in the UK. It has previously been deployed in Afghanistan, The Post said.
  • The drone will relay information to both French and British border authorities, who can then intercept the crossings.
  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Wednesday that Channel crossings are illegal, but expressed sympathy for families risking their lives to cross.
  • In August, a record 1,468 people made the 20-mile journey. The total number of arrivals is past 5,000 in 2020 so far. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The UK has deployed a military unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) over the English Channel to monitor — and stop — migrants trying to cross after record numbers arrived in August.

A British Army

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a close up of a book: Photograph: Kean Collection/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Kean Collection/Getty Images

There has never been an isolated, insular “Little England”, with migrants arriving throughout the Middle Ages and influencing the nation’s language, culture and identity, according to a new history.

Economic migration was far more commonplace in medieval England than is traditionally thought, the authors suggest: it was not just invading armies and powerful, wealthy families of Europe who helped to shape England’s history and heritage.

“People often do not realise that migration is central to English history through time,” said Joanna Story, professor of early medieval history at the University of Leicester and co-editor of Migrants in Medieval England, c. 500- c.1500. “It’s viewed as a post-war phenomenon, and people from migrant backgrounds may think migration is new to British society. That’s just not fair or right. Britain has always been made up of layers and layers and layers of

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There has never been an isolated, insular “Little England”, with migrants arriving throughout the Middle Ages and influencing the nation’s language, culture and identity, according to a new history.

Economic migration was far more commonplace in medieval England than is traditionally thought, the authors suggest: it was not just invading armies and powerful, wealthy families of Europe who helped to shape England’s history and heritage.

“People often do not realise that migration is central to English history through time,” said Joanna Story, professor of early medieval history at the University of Leicester and co-editor of Migrants in Medieval England, c. 500- c.1500. “It’s viewed as a post-war phenomenon, and people from migrant backgrounds may think migration is new to British society. That’s just not fair or right. Britain has always been made up of layers and layers and layers of incomers.”

Migrants typically arrived in England – which was

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