CIUDAD JUÁREZ, Mexico —  President Andrés Manuel López Obrador on Friday said Mexico has no choice but to pay its water debt to the U.S., or else face retaliation that could include new tariffs from the Trump administration, even as clashes continue over plans to release more of the precious liquid.

The populist López Obrador is in the tricky position of having to meet Mexico’s obligations under the shadow of the Trump administration while farmers, many of whom voted for  López Obrador, worry that they won’t have enough water for their crops if that happens.

“Unilateral measures could be taken that affect Mexico with the excuse that we are not meeting the treaty’s agreement,” López Obrador said Friday. “Like the creation of tariffs, taxes, on the products we sell and export to the U.S.”

The drought-stricken northern state of Chihuahua, across from Texas, has seen violent protests over the government’s

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MEXICO CITY, Sept. 17 (Xinhua) — Mexico’s Business Coordinating Council (CCE) has launched an online platform to support businesses affected by the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the country’s leading business lobby said on Thursday.

The website “ImpulsaTuEmpresa.mx,” whose name means “promote your company”, offers business owners detailed information on sources of financial aid, as well as information on healthcare and lockdown measures in their region.

“In the coming days, we will launch a campaign on social networks to publicize the website and its functions, through video, infographics and other multimedia content,” the CCE said in a statement.

According to the CCE, the main complaints from companies have to do with confusion regarding modified opening and closing times for businesses, and pandemic protocols.

Mexico on June 1 began to gradually reactivate some sectors of the economy that had been idled since the end of March to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

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Monica Cardenas Leal was living the Mexican dream.



a man and a woman looking at the camera: Monica Cardenas was laid off in June from the factory where she assembled parts for helicopters and airplanes, one of millions of Mexicans who have lost work because of COVID-19. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)


© Provided by The LA Times
Monica Cardenas was laid off in June from the factory where she assembled parts for helicopters and airplanes, one of millions of Mexicans who have lost work because of COVID-19. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

As her once-sleepy hometown of Querétaro transformed into an international hub of the aerospace industry, Cardenas grew with it. The daughter of a carpenter who worked multiple jobs to put food on the table, she graduated from a state aeronautics university and went to work for a Spanish firm assembling parts for Cessna jets and Sikorsky helicopters.

Her $500-a-month salary lifted her family into Mexico’s middle class.

She and her truck-driver husband took beach vacations and bought a house in the suburbs. Their children, outfitted in name-brand sneakers and braces, aspired to careers in architecture and psychology.

The coronavirus threatens

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