• The Mexican government says at least one of its citizens received a non-consensual surgery while detained at a US immigration facility in Irwin, Georgia.
  • The facility made headlines last month after a whistleblower claimed numerous women were being subjected to unwanted surgeries, including hysterectomies.
  • The Mexican government did not specify what surgery the woman had received but said it is in touch with a lawyer who is considering a class-action lawsuit.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Mexican government says it is consulting with a lawyer about a possible class-action lawsuit after it says one of its citizens underwent an unauthorized surgery while detained by US immigration authorities.

In an October 10 statement, Mexico’s foreign ministry said a woman held by Immigration and Customs Enforcement at a facility in Georgia underwent surgery to which she did not consent and was medically neglected in its aftermath.

The woman was

Read More

  • Two protesters chained themselves to an obelisk in Santa Fe to protest the New Mexico capital’s failure to remove the celebration of settler victory over “savage” indigenous peoples.
  • In June, Santa Fe Mayor Alan Webber pledged to remove the monument, which was erected in 1866.
  • The obelisk, in historic Santa Fe plaza, celebrates “the heroes who have fallen in the various battles with the savage Indians in the territory of New Mexico.”
  • In 1974, an activist posing as a city worker scratched out the word “savage.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Visitors to the historic plaza in Santa Fe, a bastion of liberalism in northern New Mexico, will find a charming square in the Spanish colonial style, surrounded by shops selling native wares — typically sold by non-native peoples — and a monument at the center of it all celebrating the slaughter of the area’s original, commercially monetized

Read More

Mexico announced Monday a $14 billion investment plan in cooperation with the private sector to boost the pandemic-stricken economy through infrastructure projects.

The initial phase of the 297-billion-peso plan will start with 39 projects in the areas of communications, energy and the environment, President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said.

“We’re going to sign an agreement with the private sector that will also mean investment, jobs and (greater) well-being,” the left-wing populist told reporters.

The plan is expected to create up to 190,000 jobs, according his government, many of them in the energy industry, a pillar of Lopez Obrador’s economic strategy.

Almost a third of the investment will be used to rehabilitate facilities of debt-laden state oil giant Pemex.

Carlos Salazar, president of the country’s influential Business Coordinating Council, said the plan sends a “message of unity and well-being,” while urging the government to give businesses “clear and stable rules.”

Lopez

Read More

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Mexico’s government presented an almost $14 billion infrastructure investment plan on Monday as President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador seeks to repair rocky relations with business leaders and lift the struggling economy.

FILE PHOTO: Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador delivers his second state of the union address at National Palace in Mexico City, Mexico, September 1, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Romero/File Photo

The package, mostly privately financed, is the first clear sign of corporate bosses’ readiness to invest under Lopez Obrador since the coronavirus pandemic this spring plunged Latin America’s second-biggest economy into its biggest slump since the Great Depression.

Ranging from the revival of a planned train link between Mexico City and the central city of Queretaro to investments for state oil firm Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), it comprises some 39 projects, the government said.

Unveiling the plan, worth over 297 billion pesos ($13.83 billion), at a news

Read More

LAS VEGAS, Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Asia Broadband Inc. (OTC: AABB), through its wholly owned subsidiary Asia Metals Inc., today announced that it has signed a Letter of Intent (LOI) to acquire a high potential mineral property in the state of Colima, Mexico.  The property is located in a prolific iron-copper-gold production area approximately 25 kms east of the Pena Colorada mine in Minatitlan, Mexico.  Advantageously located with direct access to main Highway #3, the property also has a natural water supply.  The land parcel is located at 19°18’47.3″N 103°53’49.9″W and consists of 100 hectares.  Strategically viewed as a diversification acquisition, the Colima property is situated in a region where AABB has a comparative advantage of development resources and expertise readily available to rapidly develop the project.  The Company is conducting its final stages of due diligence in preparation to complete the property acquisition agreement.  

AABB

Read More

Updated

Read More

Authorities say thieves stole a business jet from an airport in central Mexico, flew it to Venezuela, loaded it with drugs and then crashed the plane in Guatemala

Prosecutors in Guatemala said a total of four bodies were found around the site where the BAE 125 jet crashed and burned Wednesday.

The dead could not be immediately identified, but drugs and weapons were found in the burned wreckage of the craft, which authorities referred to as a Hawker 800.

Read More

VANCOUVER, British Columbia, Sept. 09, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Almaden Minerals Ltd. (“Almaden” or “the Company”; TSX: AMM; NYSE American: AAU) is pleased to report that the second district court in Puebla (the “Court”) has issued a decision in respect of the “incident” filed by Almaden’s Mexican subsidiary on February 4 of this year.

As reported previously by the Company (see press release of February 27, 2020), Almaden’s subsidiary filed this “incident” to challenge an October, 2019 decision by Mexico’s environmental authority (“SEMARNAT”) to suspend its review of the Ixtaca project’s environmental permit application (“MIA”) until resolution of legal proceedings (the “Amparo”) regarding certain of the Company’s mineral concessions which encompass the area of the Ixtaca project.  In April 2019, a lower court ruling in the Amparo found Mexico’s mineral title system unconstitutional. That ruling has been appealed by each of the Mexican Congress, Senate,

Read More
/quality/85/?url=http://media.beam.usnews.com/b8/ae0f077358b5237e2b3ee2a67ddb5d/tag:reuters.com,2020:newsml_LYNXMPEG8F0ES:12020-09-16T061216Z_1_LYNXMPEG8F0ES_RTROPTP_3_STORM-SALLY-ENERGY.JPG">

By Erwin Seba and Stephanie Kelly

HOUSTON/NEW YORK (Reuters) – More than a quarter of U.S. Gulf of Mexico offshore oil and gas production remained shut by Hurricane Sally, which was moving inland on Wednesday and dumping heavy rains and cutting fuel demand in the U.S. Southeast.

The storm made landfall early Wednesday near Gulf Shores, Alabama, as a powerful Category 2 hurricane, swamping the region with 10 to 20 inches (25-50 cm) of rain and boosting U.S. crude oil and gasoline prices. Some coastal areas received as much as 35 inches of rainfall, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said.

Some 508,000 barrels per day of oil production and 805 million cubic feet per day (mmcfd) of natural gas output were shut in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, according to the U.S. Interior Department. That is roughly a third of the shut-ins caused by Hurricane Laura, which landed further west

Read More

(Bloomberg) — A U.S. company selling a chemical across Mexico that is essential for making heroin stopped all sales in the country after a Bloomberg Businessweek investigation found it was easily diverted to make the drug fueling a U.S. epidemic. The announcement came Tuesday as Mexican authorities said they were opening a criminal investigation.

Read: Heroin’s Hidden Ingredient Is a Chemical Made by U.S. Companies

Avantor Inc.’s stock price fell 1.5% percent after its disclosure, before paring losses.

The company has sold a chemical called acetic anhydride in jugs that are big enough to make lucrative quantities of heroin, but small enough to load into the trunk of a car. Although strictly regulated under international narcotics laws, the chemical was virtually unregulated in Mexico, where Avantor supplied a thriving retail market through bricks-and-mortar shops, distributors and online sellers, Bloomberg found.

It also found evidence Avantor’s product was used in

Read More