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Eugenia Podestá, senior director of economic empowerment and entrepreneurship at Vital Voices Global Partnership and co-owner of Synergy Coworking is seen here at Synergy Coworking in 2017. 




Ramon Ortiz, vice chair of the Latino Chamber of Commerce, said the pandemic has “peeled back the veneer of civilized society,” highlighting disparities across the country. In Wisconsin, where Hispanic and Asian or Asian American residents are among the fastest-growing populations, he said, those fighting for equality must understand the backdrop for their struggle. 

Wisconsin “has one of the greatest racial disparities between Black and white,” Ortiz said. “It has yet to even grapple with that, let alone try to address the complexity of Latinos and Asians within this new milieu of race and politics.”

[After paying off its mortgage, Mt. Zion partners to offer mental health services]



48 most powerful Latinos in Wisconsin (copy)

Ramon Ortiz, shown here in a 2016 file photo, is

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People wait for a bus in August in East Los Angeles. Latinos have the highest rate of labor force participation of any group in California — many in public-facing jobs deemed essential. That work has put them at higher risk of catching the coronavirus.

Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images


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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

People wait for a bus in August in East Los Angeles. Latinos have the highest rate of labor force participation of any group in California — many in public-facing jobs deemed essential. That work has put them at higher risk of catching the coronavirus.

Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Working as a fast-food cashier in Los Angeles, Juan Quezada spends a lot of his time these days telling customers how to wear a mask.

“They cover their mouth but not their nose,” he says. “And we’re like, ‘You gotta put your mask

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ProPublica has found that the loan company Oportun Inc. sued thousands of people struggling during the coronavirus pandemic that had fallen behind on payments.” data-reactid=”16″A new investigation from ProPublica has found that the loan company Oportun Inc. sued thousands of people struggling during the coronavirus pandemic that had fallen behind on payments.

OPRT) for comment, but didn’t receive a response by the time of publication.” data-reactid=”17″Yahoo Finance reached out to Oportun (OPRT) for comment, but didn’t receive a response by the time of publication.

The company says they ”serve the approximately 100 million people in the United States who are typically shut out of the financial mainstream because they don’t have a credit score or have limited credit history.” 

Oportun, which offers personal loans and auto loans, operates in 12 states, billing itself as a friendly and more affordable option to predatory payday lenders. The company, whose

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