The Maharashtra unit of Indian Medical Association (IMA) has said that at least 57 doctors providing private medical services in Maharashtra have succumbed in the war against Corona virus. However, the Department of Health, Maharashtra Government, have rejected at least 16 insurance claims, a press statement issued by IMA ( Maharashtra) said on Tuesday.

President of IMA (Maharashtra), Avinash Bhondwe told BusinessLine that the family members had applied for the insurance claims, but IMA’s information is that at least 16 claims of private doctors have been rejected. The number could also be higher. After the Centre announced the Rs 50 lakh insurance coverage for health workers, including doctors, the responsibility fell upon the State Government to implement the schemes. The Insurance company would make the payout, but the whole scheme is stuck in the bureaucratic morass, he said

Treat doctors on par with martyrs of armed forces

The state government

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  • President Donald Trump is set to be discharged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday after his condition improved significantly following treatments, his doctors said.
  • Trump tested positive for COVID-19 late last week, though a precise timeline of his infection remains unclear.
  • Before the doctors spoke to reporters, Trump tweeted that he would get out of the hospital at 6:30 p.m.
  • Dr. Sean Conley, the White House physician, did not answer questions about Trump’s test results or whether Trump was contagious.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump is set to head back to the White House on Monday after being cleared by his doctors.

In a press briefing, Trump’s doctors said his condition had rapidly improved during his stay at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and following several therapeutic COVID-19 treatments.

Dr. Sean Conley, the White House physician, said that while the president

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  • President Trump’s doctor has declined to answer several major questions about the president’s COVID-19 case.
  • His physicians are bound by HIPAA privacy laws, which only allow them to disclose the details about a patient’s health that the patient has authorized them to share.
  • No law requires presidents to share all their health information with the public. 
  • “The ethics are stacked up against the public understanding, knowing, and really following what’s happening,” one expert said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The public will likely never know all the details surrounding President Donald Trump’s battle with COVID-19.

His doctor, Sean Conley, declined to share key details about Trump’s health during a press conference on Monday, citing the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).

“I’m not at liberty to discuss,” Conley said when asked about Trump’s lung scans, adding, “there are HIPAA rules and regulations that restrict me

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President Donald Trump could be discharged from the hospital where he is being treated for Covid-19 as soon as Monday, according to his doctors, although his condition remains unclear and outside experts warn that his case may be severe.

Sequestered at Walter Reed National Military Medical Centre outside Washington since Friday, Trump has released a series of videos in an effort to reassure the public that he is recovering from a pandemic that has infected 7.4 million Americans and killed more than 209,000.

“It’s a very interesting journey. I learned a lot about COVID,” he said in a video posted to Twitter on Sunday.

A return to the White House might help Trump project a sense of normalcy as he faces a difficult re-election battle against Democrat Joe Biden.

A Reuters/Ipsos poll released on Sunday showed Trump trailing Biden by 10 percentage points. About 65 per cent of Americans said

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By Florence Tan

SINGAPORE, Oct 5 (Reuters)Oil prices rose more than 1% on Monday, lifted by comments from doctors for U.S. President Donald Trump suggesting he could be discharged from hospital as soon as Monday, just a few days after his positive test for COVID-19 sparked widespread alarm.

Trump’s health update eased political uncertainty in global markets, pushing Brent LCOc1 up to $39.79 a barrel by 0140 GMT, gaining 52 cents or 1.3%. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude CLc1 was at $37.64 a barrel, up 59 cents, or 1.6%.

Prices had slumped more than 4% on Friday amid uncertainty surrounding Trump’s health, adding to concern that rising coronavirus case numbers that could dampen global economic recovery.

But analysts said Monday’s rebound was driven by an easing of the worst fears about Trump’s health condition, albeit clouded by some mixed signals.

“I think it’s the improving health

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SINGAPORE – Oil prices rose about 2% on Monday, lifted by comments from doctors for U.S. President Donald Trump suggesting he could be discharged from hospital as soon as Monday, just a few days after his positive test for COVID-19 sparked widespread alarm.

Trump’s health update eased political uncertainty in global markets, pushing Brent up to $39.96 a barrel by 0232 GMT, gaining 69 cents or 1.8%. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude was at $37.81 a barrel, up 76 cents, or 2.1%.

Prices had slumped more than 4% on Friday amid uncertainty surrounding Trump’s health, adding to concern that rising coronavirus case numbers that could dampen global economic recovery.

AMERICAN OIL REFINERIES RACE TO PRODUCE RENEWABLE DIESEL AHEAD OF CANADIAN COMPETITION: REPORT

But analysts said Monday’s rebound was driven by an easing of the worst fears

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GREEN BAY, Wis. (WBAY) – 250 Green Bay area doctors signed an open letter being sent to elected officials and the community at large saying “we are overwhelmed.” The letter implores them to practice and promote the healthy practices we’ve heard so much during this pandemic: Wear a face mask, social distance, wash your hands, stay home if sick.



a close up of a sign: Hospital sign


© Provided by Green Bay-Appleton WBAY-TV
Hospital sign

The letter, penned by Prevea president/CEO Dr. Ashok Rai and infectious disease specialist Dr. Sarah Luloff, says hospitalizations for COVID-19 in Green Bay hospitals tripled during the month of September.

“To say that providing care to these patients is severely straining our local hospitals, health care workers and health systems is a drastic understatement. There is no other way to say it: We are overwhelmed.”

The list of doctors joining the letter includes emergency room doctors, surgeons, oncologists, family practitioners, radiologists, rheumatologists,

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Female doctors get paid less than male doctors, but a new study disputes the common wisdom that it’s because they work less.



a person looking at the camera


© Shutterstock


In fact, female doctors spend more time with patients, order more tests and spend more time discussing preventive care than their male counterparts, a team of researchers reported in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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“That raises the question of whether we are paying for what we really care about in health care,” said Dr. Ishani Ganguli, an internal medicine specialist at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, who led the study team.

Ganguli and colleagues looked at billing and time data covering more than 24 million visits to primary care doctors in the US in 2017.

“We calculated that women were paid 87 cents to the dollar for every hour worked compared to their male colleagues,” Ganguli told CNN.

Female doctors

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The wedding band is gone. So are his class ring, his wristwatch, the neckties he has worn for decades — even the white coat with his name embroidered in blue.

Since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, James McNabb has switched to wearing just surgical scrubs. It’s a departure from the Norman Rockwell image of a small-town doctor, depicted in a print hanging at McNabb’s small-town practice in Mooresville, N.C. But the stripped-down look leaves fewer places for coronavirus to hide.

The staff disinfects the office five times a day. The waiting-room magazines have all been tossed out, eliminating another route of infection.

McNabb says these are just some of the permanent changes the coronavirus has wrought on his practice. For many solo practitioners, the virus has forced a stark choice — adapt or shut down.

Doctors who have been scrambling to stay afloat are changing the way they interact

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The British Medical Journal revealed on Wednesday a calculator that can predict patients’ risk of death from the coronavirus, Daily Mail reported.

The calculator has a checklist that includes: age, sex, number of co-morbidities or other health conditions, rate of breathing, oxygen saturation levels, level of consciousness, urea level, amount of a protein circulating in the blood that shows inflammation.

The calculator has a scoring range between 0 and 21. This device will be used at the entrance of the hospitals.

If a patient scores high, s/he may be rushed to the intensive care unit; those who score low will be discharged.

This calculator will also help in containing the overwhelming crowd in hospitals due to the coronavirus.

The researchers developed the app after testing it on over 57,000 patients in the United Kingdom. Patients who participated in the study had an average age of 74 years.

The calculator classifies

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