• President Donald Trump said he “could be one of the diers” in an October 3 phone call after he was hospitalized following his COVID-19 diagnosis, according to New York Magazine’s Intelligencer.
  • On Friday, Intelligencer published details from the phone call, showing a perspective of the president that comes in stark contrast with his largely optimistic tone since contracting the disease.
  • In the call last Saturday, the president said he was feeling good but admitted that he still had some uncertainty in his wellbeing with the coronavirus, according to the Intelligencer article.
  • “This thing could go either way,” Trump said, citing Intelligencer’s article. “It’s tricky. They told me it’s tricky. You can tell it can go either way.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump recognized his own mortality following his COVID-19 diagnosis in a phone call last week, according to details published on Friday by New York

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By Kristina Hooper, Chief Global Market Strategist

Weekly Market Compass: We explore the impact of three key events on markets and the economy

Last week’s news cycle was relentless. Tuesday’s chaotic US presidential debate dominated headlines for a few days – until Friday, when President Donald Trump announced that he and the first lady tested positive for COVID-19. Amidst all of this, a disappointing US jobs report flew mostly under the radar. This week, I explore these three issues in terms of economic and market implications.

The debate

In my view, the first presidential debate was unruly and stressful, to say the least. I’m not sure I’ve heard three human beings talk over each other so much since my three kids were all under the age of five. I had a list of issues that I hoped to hear about during the event. But unfortunately, very little in the way

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News that President Donald Trump has been infected with a virus that’s killed more than 200,000 of his fellow Americans has further unsettled investors and business leaders who were already on edge ahead of the November election.



Donald Trump standing in front of a television screen: A man wearing a face mask walks near a TV screen reporting about U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump during a news program with a file image of Trump at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. Trump said early Friday that he and Melania Trump have tested positive for the coronavirus, a stunning announcement that plunges the country deeper into uncertainty just a month before the presidential election. The Korean letters read: "President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump tested positive for COVID-19." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)


© Lee Jin-man/AP
A man wearing a face mask walks near a TV screen reporting about U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump during a news program with a file image of Trump at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. Trump said early Friday that he and Melania Trump have tested positive for the coronavirus, a stunning announcement that plunges the country deeper into uncertainty just a month before the presidential election. The Korean letters read: “President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump tested positive for COVID-19.” (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

It’s a truism that investors hate uncertainty. But this year had been unusually chaotic,

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By April Joyner and Lewis Krauskopf

(Reuters) – Investors are gauging how a potential deterioration in President Donald Trump’s health could impact asset prices in coming weeks, as the U.S. leader remains hospitalized after being diagnosed with COVID-19.

So far, markets have been comparatively sanguine: hopes of a breakthrough in talks among U.S. lawmakers on another stimulus package took the edge off a stock market selloff on Friday, with the S&P 500 losing less than 1% and so-called safe-haven assets seeing limited demand. News of Trump’s hospitalization at a military medical center outside Washington, where he remained on Saturday, came after trading ended on Friday.

Many investors are concerned, however, that a serious decline in Trump’s health less than a month before Americans go to the polls on Nov. 3 could roil a U.S. stock market that recently notched its worst monthly performance since its selloff in March while causing

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“I’m optimistic. I’m always optimistic,” she said. “We always have to find a path — that is our responsibility to do so — and I believe that we will.”

Democrats had sought a $2.2 trillion package, while the White House’s most recent offer was closer to $1.6 trillion. Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin spoke Friday afternoon for 65 minutes and plan to continue their discussions, according to Drew Hammill, a spokesman for the House speaker.

The pace of talks — and the possibility of a deal — have picked up markedly in recent days. White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows told reporters Friday that Trump had inquired about the status of negotiations Friday morning, shortly after the president announced his positive coronavirus test.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) sounded a positive note at a news conference in Kentucky.

“I’m trying to figure out here whether I should

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The president’s COVID-19 diagnosis Thursday makes one thing certain: The virus will remain the central issue in the election.

This is problematic for the president because his job approval on this topic is low. And, as a matter of election framing, the tables have been turned. Trump has argued that Biden is too old, too sick and too senile to serve: Now, President Trump is the sick one, and Biden is healthy.

But Trump’s illness also provides him with an opportunity to change the trajectory of the conversation on coronavirus, something he has badly needed. He can now cast himself with the people he governs, and offer at least a thimble-full of humility.

Essentially, for a president who has presided over a very divided country, there’s a simple message for this moment: We are all in this together.

It’s a sobering moment for the world to see the American president

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The wedding band is gone. So are his class ring, his wristwatch, the neckties he has worn for decades — even the white coat with his name embroidered in blue.

Since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, James McNabb has switched to wearing just surgical scrubs. It’s a departure from the Norman Rockwell image of a small-town doctor, depicted in a print hanging at McNabb’s small-town practice in Mooresville, N.C. But the stripped-down look leaves fewer places for coronavirus to hide.

The staff disinfects the office five times a day. The waiting-room magazines have all been tossed out, eliminating another route of infection.

McNabb says these are just some of the permanent changes the coronavirus has wrought on his practice. For many solo practitioners, the virus has forced a stark choice — adapt or shut down.

Doctors who have been scrambling to stay afloat are changing the way they interact

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