NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump reportedly must pay back more than $300 million in loans over the next four years, raising the possibility his lenders could face an unprecedented situation should he win a second term and not be able to raise the money: foreclosing on the leader of the free world.

But financial experts say the notion of Trump going broke anytime soon is farfetched.

Even with a total debt load across his entire business empire estimated at more than $1 billion, they note he still has plenty of assets he could cash in, starting with a portfolio that includes office and condo towers, golf courses and branding deals that have been valued at $2.5 billion.

Based on Forbes magazine estimates of the value of his buildings, for instance, selling his partial interests in just two properties— an office complex in San Francisco and a Las Vegas

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a man standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik


© AP Photo/Andrew Harnik
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

  • Congress is gearing up for a major Supreme Court nomination battle, absorbing most of the attention away from another coronavirus relief bill.
  • The GOP’s swift action on the court appointment is a stark contrast with its reluctance to approve additional stimulus spending earlier this year.
  • “It’s like coasting up a mountain where every further inch that you go, you risk stopping and begin to go backwards,” said Ernie Tedeschi, an Evercore policy economist.
  • Given the Supreme Court battle, the prospect of additional aid for people and businesses before Americans cast their ballots on November 3 is extremely slim.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

With a fierce battle over a Supreme Court replacement underway, Congress is shifting its attention away from passing another coronavirus relief package. Senate Republicans, under Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, are moving swiftly to

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  • Congress is gearing up for a major Supreme Court nomination battle, absorbing most of the attention away from another coronavirus relief bill.
  • The GOP’s swift action on the high court appointment is a stark contrast to their reluctance to approve additional stimulus spending earlier this year.
  • “It’s like coasting up a mountain where every further inch that you go, you risk stopping and begin to go backwards,” Evercore policy economist Ernie Tedeschi said.
  • The prospect of additional aid to individuals and businesses is extremely slim before Americans cast their ballots on November 3, given the Supreme Court battle underway.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

With a fierce Supreme Court replacement battle underway, Congress is shifting its attention away from passing another coronavirus relief package. Senate Republicans under Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are moving swiftly to confirm a third Supreme Court justice appointed by President Donald Trump.

It’s a

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One of the UK’s biggest employers is planning to close nearly 100 offices permanently in a crushing blow to the Prime Minister’s campaign to get Britain back to work.

The Mail on Sunday can reveal that Capita – the giant Government contractor that collects the BBC licence fee, runs the London congestion charge and provides other key public services – is preparing to shutter more than a third of its 250 offices across Britain.

The huge raft of closures will make Capita the first major British firm to pull out of city and town centres as an increasing number of companies look at a permanent shift to flexible working arrangements after staff worked successfully from home during lockdown.

Under its plans, many of Capita’s 45,000 UK staff will continue to work from home – as most have done since March – and will only attend a smaller number of regional

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