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  • A family in California has claimed that Sen. Kamala Harris and California Gov. Gavin Newsom trespassed on their property for a photo op while surveying damage from the Creek Fire on Tuesday.
  • “What has me really frustrated right now is the fact that these two politicians used my parents’ loss for a photo opportunity to push their political agenda!” Trampas Patten wrote on Facebook.
  • Patten and his sister, Bailee, added that their parents had still not been able to return to their home.
  • During the tour of the wildfire devastation in Auberry, California, Harris blamed climate change for the wildfires.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A family accused California Gov. Gavin Newsom and Sen. Kamala Harris, the Democratic vice presidential nominee, of trespassing on their property while surveying damage from one of the state’s wildfires on Tuesday. 

Newsom took Harris on a tour of the damage left behind

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A business owner in Kenosha, Wis., is accusing President TrumpDonald John TrumpMelania Trump used private email account while in White House, ex-friend says Trump reiterates call for drug test before debates, claims Biden ‘is on some kind of an enhancement’ How Markey took down a Kennedy MORE of using his destroyed store for political gain during a visit to the city on Tuesday.

Tom Gram, the owner of a century-old store called Rode’s Camera Shop that burned to the ground last week amid protests following the police shooting of Jacob Blake, told local outlet TMJ4 that he declined the White House’s request to be part of Trump’s tour of the damage.

“I think everything he does turns into a circus and I just didn’t want to be involved in it,” Gram said.

He also said he was stunned to see the store’s former owner, John Rode, who sold the

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Despite a rise in first time unemployment claims and a second dismal economic report, President Trump touted his economic stewardship at a small rally near the birthplace of his political rival, Joe Biden. (Aug. 20)

AP Domestic

At their political conventions this month, President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden laid out starkly divergent visions of how to dig the U.S. economy out of the deepest downturn since the Great Depression amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Trump promised more cuts to taxes and regulations, and dangled the prospect of additional tariffs against China.

“We will go right after China,” Trump said. “We will not rely on them one bit.  We’re taking our business out of China. We are bringing it home. We want our business to come home.”

He added, “We will continue to reduce taxes and regulations at levels not seen before.”

Biden vowed to raise taxes

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A conservative student group called College Republicans United at Arizona State University is raising money for the teen suspected of killing two people and injuring another at a protest in Kenosha, Wis., this week.

“Half of all funds collected this semester for Republicans United will be donated to 17-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse legal defense fund,” a tweet by the group said Thursday. “He does not deserve to have his entire life destroyed because of the actions of violent anarchists during a lawless riot.”

Kyle Rittenhouse, a 17-year-old from Illinois, has been accused of shooting and killing 26-year-old Anthony Huber

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Protesters rally outside the Rio Tinto office in Perth, Australia, June 9, 2020. Rio Tinto chief executive Jean-Sebastien Jacques will lose around $3.5 million in bonuses due to the destruction in May of Australian indigenous sacred sites, the mining company said on Monday, Aug. 24, 2020. (Richard Wainwright/AAP Image via AP)


© Provided by Associated Press
Protesters rally outside the Rio Tinto office in Perth, Australia, June 9, 2020. Rio Tinto chief executive Jean-Sebastien Jacques will lose around $3.5 million in bonuses due to the destruction in May of Australian indigenous sacred sites, the mining company said on Monday, Aug. 24, 2020. (Richard Wainwright/AAP Image via AP)

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Rio Tinto chief executive Jean-Sebastien Jacques will lose around $3.5 million in bonuses due to the destruction of Australian indigenous sacred sites to access iron ore, the mining company said on Monday.



Rio Tinto chief executive, Jean-Sebastien Jacques attends an annual general meeting in Perth, Australia, May 9, 2019. Jacques will lose around $3.5 million in bonuses due to the destruction in May of Australian indigenous sacred sites, the mining company said on Monday, Aug. 24, 2020. (Will Russell/AAP Image via AP)


© Provided by Associated Press
Rio Tinto chief executive, Jean-Sebastien Jacques attends an annual general meeting in Perth, Australia, May 9, 2019. Jacques will lose around $3.5 million in bonuses due to the destruction in May of Australian indigenous sacred sites, the mining company said on Monday, Aug. 24, 2020. (Will Russell/AAP Image via AP)

The Anglo-Australia mining

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