The world’s clocks implacably mark every passing second, minute, and hour. But to humans, seconds of pain can feel like minutes, hours spent at a party can end in a blink, and a week of drudging through paperwork can vanish from the mind entirely.



a person sitting on a bed next to a window: A woman receives a manicu​re and pedicure from an at-home beauty service in​ New York during the coronavirus pandemic. Emerging research suggests that wealth may be a factor in whether your brain makes more "time codes" as you form memories, giving you a subjectively longer life in retrospect.


© Photograph by Natalie Keyssar, The New York Times via Redux

A woman receives a manicu​re and pedicure from an at-home beauty service in​ New York during the coronavirus pandemic. Emerging research suggests that wealth may be a factor in whether your brain makes more “time codes” as you form memories, giving you a subjectively longer life in retrospect.


The brain can stretch or compress the feeling of time for many reasons, including pleasure, pain, fear, age—and even the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Although the science behind this “subjective time” is not fully understood, some research suggests that an additional factor might influence the subjective length of

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