MELBOURNE (Reuters) – Rio Tinto RIO.AX parted ways with its CEO and two senior executives on Friday, bowing to mounting shareholder criticism of the destruction of two significant Aboriginal rockshelters and the global miner’s limited initial response.

Chief executive Jean-Sébastien Jacques, who has led Rio since 2016, will step down by March 31 next year, the company said, after shareholders expressed concerns about executive accountability.

The head of iron ore, Chris Salisbury, and Simone Niven, head of corporate relations, the unit responsible for dealing with indigenous communities, will also depart.

The move came after activists and investors said Rio had not done enough in an earlier board-led review into how the miner legally detonated rockshelters showing 46,000 years of human habitation at Juukan Gorge in Western Australia against the wishes of traditional owners. The review had cut short-term bonuses for some executives.

“Despite a drawn out process, we feel the

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The first major cruise ship to set sail in the Mediterranean was poised to depart from Genoa on Sunday, as Italy’s struggling travel industry hopes to regain ground after a bruising coronavirus hiatus.

The departure of the MSC Grandiosa from the northwestern port city at 1930 local time (1730 GMT) represents a high-stakes test for the global sector in the key Mediterranean market and beyond.

The international cruise industry has been battered not only by the ongoing health crisis which in March forced the worldwide grounding of its ships, but accusations of a botched handling of the epidemic in its early stages.

Cruise lines are hoping that new, tighter protocols will allow them to control the still-lingering threat of coronavirus aboard its ships while still offering travellers a cruise experience that does not disappoint.

The Grandiosa is part of the fleet of privately-owned MSC Cruises, founded in Naples but now

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