By Huw Jones

LONDON (Reuters) – The European Union on Thursday presented plans to expand and bolster its capital market to help reboot companies hit by the coronavirus and reduce the bloc’s reliance on the City of London after Brexit.

Companies need to refund themselves as they emerge from recession caused by pandemic lockdowns, with Brussels wanting them to use stock and bond markets and reduce reliance on bank loans.

The plans would help give the EU market “strategic autonomy” when Britain exits the bloc’s single market on Dec. 31, the EU launch documents said.

Digital finance forms a core plank of the bloc’s third batch of measures in five years to create a Capital Markets Union (CMU) by including what EU officials describe as the world’s most comprehensive set of rules for cryptoassets.

“The strength of our economic recovery will depend crucially on how well our capital markets function

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LONDON (Reuters) – The European Union on Thursday presented plans to expand and bolster its capital market to help reboot companies hit by the coronavirus and reduce the bloc’s reliance on the City of London after Brexit.

Companies need to refund themselves as they emerge from recession caused by pandemic lockdowns, with Brussels wanting them to use stock and bond markets and reduce reliance on bank loans.

The plans would help give the EU market “strategic autonomy” when Britain exits the bloc’s single market on Dec. 31, the EU launch documents said.

Digital finance forms a core plank of the bloc’s third batch of measures in five years to create a Capital Markets Union (CMU) by including what EU officials describe as the world’s most comprehensive set of rules for cryptoassets.

“The strength of our economic recovery will depend crucially on how well our capital markets function and whether people

Read More

The auto industry is marked by fierce competition. Yet with automakers forced to balance investments in new technologies like electric vehicles (EVs), autonomous vehicles (AVs), and fuel cells with updates to their current portfolios, collaboration has become essential, too. Even the largest global automakers don’t have enough scale to make all of the necessary investments without putting pressure on their earnings and cash flow.

Some automakers have used mergers and acquisitions to gain scale. In other cases, they have turned to partnerships rather than full-blown mergers. Last week, General Motors (NYSE:GM) and Honda Motor (NYSE:HMC) announced a broad alliance in the North American market to boost their profitability there.

Longtime partners

GM and Honda have worked together on various projects for more than two decades. However, they have deepened their relationship considerably over the past several years.

In June 2018, GM and Honda agreed to collaborate on EV batteries, with

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(Bloomberg) — A raft of metrics show Turkey is becoming increasingly isolated from other emerging markets.

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The country has expanded its money supply and spent its foreign-exchange reserves faster than any other major developing economy. None of its major peers have a central-bank policy rate that’s so far below inflation.

The fact that these measures stand out, and that the lira’s slide appears largely homegrown, is prompting investors such as Citigroup Inc. and Fidelity International Ltd. to consider the nation separately from the rest of the asset class.

That may be a consolation for developing-nation investors hoping to avoid a rerun of 2018, when Turkey’s currency crisis helped turn attention to weak spots in other emerging markets, ultimately leading to a selloff from South Africa to Brazil and India.

Money Supply

An analysis of the M1 narrow money growth for 25 emerging markets shows that most Asian and

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