The Supreme Court has always upheld the law and stood for fairness and equity, something that the country is justifiably proud of. In the quest for fairness though, it is possible that the lines drawn by the founding fathers of the Constitution separating powers between the legislature, executive and the judiciary are sometimes crossed, inadvertently. This is something that the Court needs to be watchful of as it hears the case relating to moratorium on loan repayments by Covid-affected entities and whether ‘interest on interest’ is justified. The arguments being advanced in this case seem to be getting more and more divorced from the ground realities of commercial banking. The petitioners are persistent that banks, which have already granted borrowers six months’ time to service their loans to tide over Covid, ought to extend this privilege longer and waive interest as well. They have also implied that banks are morally

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The Jim Rome Show: Dan Woike talks the power of the NBA players strike
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While the NBA playoffs will be returning at some point — potentially this weekend — players, coaches and those around the league are still not letting up on what they want to see happen in response to the shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin on Sunday. Players want league owners to be more proactive, instead of reactive, to racial injustice and to begin making firmer commitments that go beyond monetary donations. 

These issues have now trickled into the league office, as 100 NBA employees based in New York decided to go on strike Friday morning in solidarity with NBA and WNBA players, per ESPN’s Malika Andrews. Instead of working, the day will be spent calling elected officials in order to push for change and continue the fight toward racial equality.

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