President TrumpDonald John TrumpTwo ethics groups call on House to begin impeachment inquiry against Barr Trump relishes return to large rallies following COVID-19 diagnosis McGrath: McConnell ‘can’t get it done’ on COVID-19 relief MORE‘s economic adviser Stephen MooreStephen MooreSunday shows – Coronavirus stimulus, Barrett hearings share spotlight Stephen Moore doubts need for T stimulus, predicting US economic growth On The Money: Trump gambles with new stimulus strategy | Trump cannot block grand jury subpoena for his tax returns, court rules | Long-term jobless figures rise, underscoring economic pain MORE earlier this month called the president’s debate performance “crappy” following the first debate with Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenMcConnell challenger dodges court packing question ‘Hamilton’ cast to reunite for Biden fundraiser Trump relishes return to large rallies following COVID-19 diagnosis MORE.

“It was not a great performance by Trump; in fact, I thought it was

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  • Stephen Moore, a senior economic advisor to President Donald Trump, was filmed slamming Trump’s performance at the presidential debate last month.
  • In footage published by HuffPost, Moore said at an event in Washington organized by a pro-Trump group that Trump’s performance against the Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, was “crappy.”
  • Trump has previously praised Moore as “a great pro-growth economist and a truly fine person.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

An economic advisor to President Donald Trump was filmed describing Trump’s performance in the presidential debate last month against the Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, as “crappy.”

Stephen Moore, whom Trump has previously described as “a great pro-growth economist and a truly fine person,” made the remark on October 2 at the Election Protection Summit in Washington, organized by the pro-Trump group FreedomWorks. HuffPost published the footage, which was obtained by Documented, a watchdog group.

“It was not a great

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Stephen Moore wearing a suit and tie: Stephen Moore. Samuel Corum/Getty Images


© Samuel Corum/Getty Images
Stephen Moore. Samuel Corum/Getty Images

  • Stephen Moore, a senior economic advisor to President Donald Trump, was filmed slamming Trump’s performance at the presidential debate last month.
  • In footage published by HuffPost, Moore said at an event in Washington organized by a pro-Trump group that Trump’s performance against the Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, was “crappy.”
  • Trump has previously praised Moore as “a great pro-growth economist and a truly fine person.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

An economic advisor to President Donald Trump was filmed describing Trump’s performance in the presidential debate last month against the Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, as “crappy.”

Stephen Moore, whom Trump has previously described as “a great pro-growth economist and a truly fine person,” made the remark on October 2 at the Election Protection Summit in Washington, organized by the pro-Trump group FreedomWorks. HuffPost published the footage, which was obtained

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President Donald Trump quickly put the economic focus back on himself Thursday morning, after Wednesday night’s vice presidential debate, which covered more economic issues than his barb-trading battle with Democratic candidate Joe Biden.

“Our numbers are going to be great, our numbers for the third quarter are going to be through the roof, retail sales, employment, all of these numbers are going to be great,” Trump told Fox Business Network in a phone-in interview.

The president said he had shut down stimulus talks because both sides were haggling over terms and “it wasn’t going anywhere,” he said. “I don’t want to play games. And then we reopened, and I see the markets are doing well but I think we have a really good chance of doing something.”

Wednesday’s debate brought a more civil tone atop simmering tensions between the two candidates and covered, albeit briefly in the two-minute response allotment,

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  • President Donald Trump’s campaign left a ticket for Tupac at the vice-presidential debate, according to the New York Post. 
  • The dig comes after a recent interview during which Joe Biden’s running mate, California Sen. Kamala Harris, said Tupac is the “best rapper alive.”
  • Tupac’s family member, Mopreme Shakur, told TMZ that the invitation by the Trump campaign was “clearly disrespectful” to his loved ones. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump’s campaign left the late rapper, Tupac Shakur, a ticket to the vice presidential debate as a dig to Kamala Harris following a recent interview, according to the New York Post. 

In an interview with Angela Rye last month, Harris was asked who is “the best rapper alive” in her opinion.

“Tupac,” Harris responded and chuckled when the Democratic vice presidential nominee realized her error. 

 

Trump’s campaign senior adviser, Jason Miller,

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Both sides in the debate over a ballot measure to change Illinois’ income tax system from a flat-rate to a graduated structure have straightforward arguments

Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker and other proponents call it the “fair tax” because it demands more from those with higher incomes. Those making less than $250,000 a year would pay no more than the current 4.95% flat rate.

Opponents point to the state’s history of political corruption, saying the proposal on the November ballot would loosen constitutional restraints on lawmakers’ spending.

THE PROPOSAL

The ballot question would amend the Illinois Constitution to discard the current income tax system, in which every individual pays the same flat rate, 4.95%, and corporations pay 7%. It would set up brackets, like the federal government and 32 other states. The tax rate would increase with income.

BIG STAKES, BIG MONEY

Campaign group Vote Yes for Fairness

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FILE – In this March 7, 2019, file photo, Gov. J.B. Pritzker outlines his plan to replace Illinois’ flat-rate income tax with a graduated structure at the State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. Both sides in the debate over changing Illinois’ income tax system from a flat-rate to a graduated structure, which voters face on this fall’s election ballot, have straightforward arguments.

AP

Both sides in the debate over a ballot measure to change Illinois’ income tax system from a flat-rate to a graduated structure have straightforward arguments

Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker and other proponents call it the “fair tax” because it demands more from those with higher incomes. Those making less than $250,000 a year would pay no more than the current 4.95% flat rate.

Opponents point to the state’s history of political corruption, saying the proposal on the November ballot would loosen constitutional restraints on

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By JOHN O’CONNOR, AP Political Writer

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Both sides in the debate over a ballot measure to change Illinois’ income tax system from a flat-rate to a graduated structure have straightforward arguments

Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker and other proponents call it the “fair tax” because it demands more from those with higher incomes. Those making less than $250,000 a year would pay no more than the current 4.95% flat rate.

Opponents point to the state’s history of political corruption, saying the proposal on the November ballot would loosen constitutional restraints on lawmakers’ spending.

The ballot question would amend the Illinois Constitution to discard the current income tax system, in which every individual pays the same flat rate, 4.95%, and corporations pay 7%. It would set up brackets, like the federal government and 32 other states. The tax rate would increase with income.

Campaign group Vote Yes for

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New York, NY—New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli recently issued a report that as many as half of New York City’s restaurants could close indefinitely over the next year because of the coronavirus pandemic. On top of that, recent surveys indicate that the city may lose one-third of its small businesses. The five candidates running to be the next Manhattan Borough President explained recently during a debate their ideas and solutions to prop up small business during the pandemic.

N.Y. State Sen. Brad Hoylman (D-Manhattan) first said that the statistic of one out of three small businesses never returning is so alarming that it’ll require government to jump start the city’s brick-and-mortar businesses.

That’s why he’s introduced a bill with Assembly Member Harvey Epstein (D-Manhattan) that would allow small businesses that have suffered demonstrable loss in income resulting from state mandated closures or state-imposed restrictions to receive support.

Sign Up

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President Donald Trump walks out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md.

AP

Sidelined but not silenced, President Donald Trump demonstrated anew this past week he can’t be relied on to give a straight account of the disease that has afflicted millions, now including him. He heralded the arrival of a COVID-19 cure, which did not happen, and likened the coronavirus to the common flu even while knowing better.

The week featured the only vice presidential debate of the 2020 campaign and an emphasis on policy lacking in the virulent Trump vs. Joe Biden showdown of the week before.

Vice President Mike Pence asserted Trump respects the science on climate change when actually the president mocks it, and Pence defended a White House gathering that the government’s infectious disease

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