FMCG major, ITC Ltd will look to strengthen the presence of fresh dairy offerings under the “Aashirvaad Svasti” brand across the eastern region. Post consolidating presence in the existing 25-odd markets, and upcoming ones of Bihar and West Bengal, over the “next few years”, it will tap other states of the east.

According to Sanjay Singal, Chief Operating Officer – Dairy and Beverages, ITC has a presence in 24 markets including Patna in Bihar; while in West Bengal it is present primarily in Kolkata and the suburbs in the fresh dairy category. New markets in Bengal are being explored, and procurement of milk from farmers in the state is being ramped-up as part of its expansion plans.

The company has three facilities in these states, one each in Munger, Patna and Howrah.

ITC Q1FY21: FMCG saves the day, but remains low on profitability

ITC entered the dairy segment in 2018,

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(Reuters) – Oil major Chevron Corp’s

U.S. unit and waste management firm Brightmark LLC said on Wednesday they have formed a joint venture to market dairy biomethane, a renewable natural gas made of methane emissions from cattle burps.

Ruminant livestock such as cattle and sheep produce methane as a byproduct while digesting fibrous plant material. Methane accounts for 20% of global emissions and scientists have been working for years to reduce the amount of the gas released by cattle.

Chevron U.S.A. and Brightmark LLC said their investments in the new venture, Brightmark RNG Holdings LLC, will fund the construction of required infrastructure and commercial operation of dairy biomethane projects across multiple U.S. states.

Chevron will purchase the renewable natural gas produced from the JV’s projects and market it for use in vehicles that run on compressed natural gas, the companies said.

The latest move underscores a shift in investor demand,

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FILE PHOTO: Fonterra milk tanker driving past dairy cows as it arrives at Fonterra's Te Rapa plant near Hamilton, New Zealand


© Reuters/Nigel Marple
FILE PHOTO: Fonterra milk tanker driving past dairy cows as it arrives at Fonterra’s Te Rapa plant near Hamilton, New Zealand


(Reuters) – New Zealand’s Fonterra said on Monday it has agreed to sell its farms in China for a total of NZ$555 million ($367.97 million) as the dairy producer continues to focus on the domestic market and reduce debt.

The company unveiled plans last year to halt overseas expansion after being criticised by the more than 10,000 farmers who make up its cooperative for its foray into countries like China and value added consumer products that were weighing on its profits.

“For the last 18 months, we have been reviewing every part of the business to ensure our assets and investments meet the needs of the Co-op today,” Chief Executive Officer Miles Hurrell said.

“Selling the farms is in line with our decision to focus on

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The National Dairy Development Board (NDDB) on Friday launched a call centre — Pashu Mitra — for dairy farmers to address their queries on animal health, nutrition and productivity.

The move follows an increasing number of farmers seen engaging themselves in dairy farming as an agriculture-allied activity.

Dilip Rath, Chairman, NDDB, said, “From guiding the farmers to providing crucial information for enhancing animal productivity, NDDB’s call centre will prove to be a true companion of farmers. This exclusive call centre’s aim is to further strengthen dairy farming and help farmers emerge as an empowered community.”

Pashu Mitra is expected to provide substantial relief to dairy farmers in difficult times.

Also read: Amul plans to usher in a sweet revolution with branded honey

NDDB has roped in experts to address concerns of farmers on various issues relating to animal health and productivity. The dairy institution has released a number — 7574835051

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GCMMF, which markets dairy products under the Amul brand, will invest around Rs 1,000 crore over the next two years to set up milk processing plants, and another Rs 500 crore on facilities for new products like edible oil, its MD R S Sodhi said.

In an interview with PTI, Sodhi said the Gujarat Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation Ltd (GCMMF) expects 12-15 per cent growth in revenue in current fiscal year from Rs 38,550 crore during the last fiscal year despite COVID-19 pandemic, as demand for branded food products has increased.

“We will invest around Rs 1,000 crore in the next two years on setting up dairy plants across various states,” Sodhi told PTI.

He said the processing capacity would increase to 420 lakh litres per day from the current 380 lakh litres per day.

On new businesses, Sodhi said the cooperative has started manufacturing sweets as well as

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The state has teamed up with a Brooklyn venture capital firm to spur development of new milk products that will support dairy farms statewide, officials said.

The state Department of Agriculture and Markets, New York Dairy Promotion Order Advisory Board and VentureFuel Inc. have started a competition, MilkLaunch, to encourage businesses, entrepreneurs, farmers and others to invent products that contain at least 50% fluid milk.

The contest comes as milk consumption continues to fall nationwide.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports fluid milk use has dropped 40% since 1975 as consumers turn to alternatives, such as soy milk and almond milk. The rise of milk alternatives were cited by Borden Dairy Co. in Dallas as one of the reasons for its Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing earlier this year. 

The MilkLaunch contest includes more than $250,000 worth of prizes, including laboratory time, marketing assistance and support from food scientists at Cornell

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After dairy farming for several years in Drums, Pennsylvania (Luzerne County) our family moved to a dairy farm in Berwick, PA (Columbia County). At first we used the existing buildings, but later constructed a large loose housing operation with a modern milking parlor.

We also purchased additional land in order to raise sufficient feed for our animals. With two brothers and two sisters heavily involved with their dairy operation, we thought we had it made.

In 1991, brother Matt and our dad went to a dairy meeting at the Berwick High conducted by the Progressive Agriculture Organization. Officials of Pro-Ag pointed out what could happen to our milk prices if something wasn’t done about the pricing formula.

With an ever-increasing number of grandchildren joining our farm operation, we made increases in milk production, but we always maintained a true family farm operation. We thought we were doing alright, but

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