That was what happened in October 2018, and again the following March, when the software forced down the noses of two of the new planes in a way their pilots could not overcome, causing crashes that killed 346 people.

The engineer’s acknowledgment is one of several revelations contained in a new report released Wednesday by investigators from the House Transportation Committee. The document details myriad gaps in oversight that allowed federal regulators to certify that the plane was safe to fly even though officials at both Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration did not fully understand how it was designed.

After months of delays by the FAA, the investigators in May were allowed to view a draft “oversight report” written months after the initial Max crash in Indonesia. The February 2019 draft report considered Boeing’s actions in the years before the deadly incident, and its conclusions shocked investigators.

The FAA’s

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