Like many future Donald Trump voters, Jason Gelinas felt something shift inside him during the presidency of Barack Obama. Things were going OK for him generally. He had a degree from Fordham University and had held a series of jobs at big financial-services firms, eventually becoming a senior vice president at Citigroup in the company’s technology department, where he led an AI project and oversaw a team of software developers. He was married with kids and had a comfortable house in a New Jersey suburb. According to those who know him, Gelinas was a pleasant guy who was into normal stuff: Game of Thrones, recreational soccer, and so on. Things did get weird, though, when politics came up.

Gelinas had registered as a Democrat in the runup to the 2008 election, but then seemed to drift to the right, and not in an “I’m going to vote for Romney

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Warhol declared, “In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes.” But was not predicted was that everyone’s “fame” would be experienced simultaneously.

Ask a kid today in the U.S. what they want to be when the grow up. No longer is musician or athlete the top answer. It’s a YouTuber—an answer 3x more popular than astronaut.

According to a new report by VC firm SignalFire, today’s global Creator Economy is only poised to grow as 50 million people already consider themselves a “Creator.” But what’s more noteworthy beyond the mass self-reported title and lowered barriers to entry are the financial opportunities that come along with becoming a Creator—a new classification of “small business.” Two million global Creators are already making six-figures, with many more amateurs aiming to achieve similar status.

“If you take a traditional job where you’re employed by somebody else, you can’t actually be yourself,”

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  • Brianna Nichole is a YouTube creator and teacher with 6,000 subscribers. 
  • Nichole started her channel two years ago, and she posts hair-care, lifestyle, and tech videos. 
  • Though Nichole has only a few thousand subscribers, she is still able to earn money as a creator through YouTube’s Partner Program. 
  • She explained how much money YouTube videos with 200,000 and 250,000 views had earned her and how smaller YouTube creators make money online.
  • Subscribe to Business Insider’s influencer newsletter: Insider Influencers.

This is the latest installment of Business Insider’s YouTube money logs, where creators break down how much they earn.

Brianna Nichole is a full-time teacher and a part-time YouTube creator who earns money each month from the ads that play in her videos. 

She launched her YouTube channel two years ago and now has about 6,000 subscribers. Her content includes hair-care videos for girls with curly hair and tech posts. Her

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  • TikTok recently opened up applications for its Creator Fund, a new multiyear $1 billion program designed to compensate creators for posting on its app.
  • The company’s move to pay its users directly could help TikTok better compete with platforms like YouTube, which shares a portion of ad revenue with creators, and Instagram, which has yet to offer any direct monetization outside IGTV.
  • But initial payments from TikTok’s fund have been underwhelming.
  • Three creators who qualified for the program told Business Insider that they’re earning just a few dollars a day after posting videos that generated tens of thousands of views.
  • Subscribe to Business Insider’s influencer newsletter: Influencer Dashboard.

When TikTok announced it was rolling out a $1 billion fund for creators in July, the company’s general manager Vanessa Pappas said its goal was to support users who are seeking opportunities to “foster a livelihood” as content creators.

The company’s decision

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  • Last week, the wildly popular game “Fortnite” got an update on Apple and Android smartphones that allowed players to bypass the companies’ digital payment systems. Instead of Apple and Google, payments went directly to the “Fortnite” studio, Epic Games.
  • In response, Apple and Google pulled “Fortnite” from their digital storefronts and cited the update as a terms-of-service violation. Epic Games sued both companies shortly thereafter for what it says is anticompetitive behavior.
  • On Monday, the legal saga got more complicated: Epic filed for a temporary restraining order against Apple to keep the company from “removing, de-listing, refusing to list or otherwise making unavailable the app ‘Fortnite,’ including any update thereof.”
  • Apple issued a response late Monday night placing the blame on Epic and digging in on the current policy. “We won’t make an exception for Epic,” the statement said, “because we don’t think it’s right to put their business interests
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  • The YouTube creator Shelby Church has 1.5 million subscribers and films videos on her channel about photography, technology, and her Tesla. 
  • Creators like Church who are a part of the YouTube Partner Program can earn money on their channels by placing ads within a video.
  • One of the videos she filmed in June 2019 was widely shared and today has over 8 million views on YouTube. The video’s subject is how much money YouTube paid her for 1 million views.
  • Church spoke with Business Insider and shared how much money her video with 8 million views earned in AdSense revenue. 
  • Subscribe to Business Insider’s influencer newsletter: Influencer Dashboard.

This is the latest installment of Business Insider’s YouTube money logs, where creators break down how much they earn.

Explaining how much money you make from YouTube can sometimes earn you even more.

The YouTube creator Shelby Church, who has 1.5 million

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