Brigham Young University-Idaho warned on Monday about accounts of college students “intentionally” trying to contract COVID-19 in order to make money by donating plasma with antibodies. 

The Idaho university issued a statement saying officials were “deeply troubled” by the alleged behavior and “is actively seeking evidence of such conduct among our student body.”

Students who are determined to have intentionally exposed themselves or others to the virus will be immediately suspended from the university and may be permanently dismissed,” the university stated.

“The contraction and spread of COVID-19 is not a light matter,” the statement continued. “Reckless disregard for health and safety will inevitably lead to additional illness and loss of life in our community.”

University officials noted that they had previously cautioned last month that if Idaho or Madison County continue to experience surges in cases, the university may have to switch to fully online learning. 

The release

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Niall Horan performs during 103.5 KISS FM's Jingle Ball at the Allstate Arena on Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Rosemont, Ill. (Photo by Rob Grabowski/Invision/AP)
Niall Horan will play a gig at the Royal Albert Hall on 7 November. (AP)

Niall Horan has announced that he is putting on a livestreamed show to raise money for his road crew.

The One Direction singer had been due to take his Nice To Meet Ya tour around the world this year, but it has been postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Horan, 27, told the BBC: “I’m obviously one of the lucky ones, but not everyone is as lucky as me.

“I’m a 27-year-old dude, I live with one person, my cousin, in the middle of London. I’m fit and I’m healthy.

Read more: Niall Horan snaps foot ligaments in drunken injury

“Our crew members are the ones that have basically been forgotten about.

“Furlough doesn’t touch them – and they are the ones who have mortgages and families and homes and lives to pay for [but]

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The Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre (Austrac) announced on Wednesday it has concluded its investigation into Afterpay, having decided it will not pursue any further regulatory action.

Austrac ordered the appointment of an external auditor into Afterpay’s Australian operations in June last year. Specifically, the regulator asked for the examination of Afterpay’s compliance with the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Act 2006 (AML/CTF Act).

“In response to the findings and recommendations identified in the external audit report, Afterpay has uplifted its AML/CTF compliance framework and financial crime function, and completed all remediation necessary to ensure compliance,” Austrac wrote on Wednesday.

“After considering the report and the response by Afterpay, Austrac has decided not to undertake further regulatory action.

Austrac said it has “reiterated the importance” for Afterpay to meet its compliance obligations in the future, and that it would continue to work with the company to ensure it understands

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Luis Suárez, Barcelona to Atlético Madrid (£5.5m)

Related: Men’s transfer window summer 2020 – all deals from Europe’s top five leagues

The transfer story of the summer was a move that didn’t happen, but while Lionel Messi stayed at Barcelona, several high-profile teammates were ushered out. Ivan Rakitic, Arturo Vidal and Rafinha left for cut-price fees but the departure of Suárez caused the most anger – not least with Messi. “You did not deserve for them to throw you out like they did,” the Argentinian told his strike partner via Instagram.

Suárez has said the manner of his departure reduced him to tears, but it may be Barça who look back with regret. Having initially tried to dictate his destination, the club were forced to let Suárez join Atlético for a £5.5m fee made up entirely of variables. The Uruguayan may be nearly 34 but forcing out such a pivotal

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Senate Judiciary Committee member Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., spent the time allotted for him to question Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett Tuesday on a “hypocritical monologue” that claimed “dark money” was behind her nomination, “The Five” co-host Dagen McDowell argued.

“I wanted to talk about Sheldon Whitehouse and the hypocritical monologue or lecture that he hacked up in front of her,” McDowell began. “[He didn’t] ask her one question. Not one. He implied that Amy Coney Barrett is not there because of her accomplishments, because of her intellect, because of how she’s lived her life, but that she’s there because she’s a pawn of dark money.

“Hypocrite! You know what that also is?” she asked. “That’s sexist. Let me call him out on it.”

McDowell recounted how Whitehouse, a former federal prosecutor, offered a 30-minute dissertation on how the Federalist Society and Judicial Crisis Network have purportedly conspired to spend

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By Roger Bales and Martha Conklin

Many of California’s 33 million acres of forests face widespread threats stemming from past management choices. Today the U.S. Forest Service estimates that of the 20 million acres it manages in California, 6-9 million acres need to be restored.

Forest restoration basically means removing the less fire-resistant smaller trees and returning to a forest with larger trees that are widely spaced. These stewardship projects require partnerships across the many interests who benefit from healthy forests, to help bring innovative financing to this huge challenge.

The California Wildfires in Photos

california wildfires

We are engineers who work on many natural resource challenges, including forest management. We’re encouraged to see California and other western states striving to use forest management to reduce the risk of high-severity wildfire.

But there are major bottlenecks. They include scarce resources and limited engagement between forest managers and many local, regional and state

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  • Top brass from JPMorgan and BlackRock, among the firms to kick off earnings season with their results, said Tuesday that they expect more consolidation in the wealth- and asset-management industries.
  • Pressures on money managers have fueled a flurry of acquisitions in those areas this year, and analysts questioned executives about their own deal ambitions, albeit coming from different corners of the market. 
  • JPMorgan boss Jamie Dimon said the bank would be “very interested” in deals in that space, and BlackRock finance chief Gary Shedlin said the firm was focused on targets that could expand its technology, global distribution, and private markets capabilities.
  • Last week, Morgan Stanley said it would buy investment manager Eaton Vance in a deal valued at $7 billion just days after it closed on its E-Trade acquisition. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Top brass at the world’s largest asset manager and largest US bank told

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Citigroup


C -4.80%

had a big quarter on Wall Street, and credit costs were much lower. But that probably didn’t matter to many investors.

Instead, many Citi shareholders are focused on the bank’s regulatory woes. Beyond the $400 million penalty imposed by regulators last week, it is not yet clear how much it will cost to resolve the consent order the bank is now operating under. Among other things, the bank will need to invest substantially more in data infrastructure to help its risk management. Dealing with Washington can be costly in general, but technology upgrades at banks can be particularly drawn-out. Before the fine, Citigroup had already disclosed $1 billion in new technology investment for this year, but it hasn’t given specific further figures tied to the consent order.

Some investors might find this frustrating and give up on the stock too soon. Others might be tempted to jump

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Eight members of Congress are calling on the Small Business Administration to investigate whether the operator of a luxury Santa Monica hotel and dozens of other properties properly spent tens of millions of dollars in pandemic relief funding.



a group of people that are talking on a cell phone: A group prays during an August demonstration supporting Margarita Santos, center, who was fired from her housekeeping job at the JW Marriott Santa Monica Le Merigot hotel. The hotel's operator, Columbia Sussex, received tens of millions of dollars in PPP loans. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)


© Provided by The LA Times
A group prays during an August demonstration supporting Margarita Santos, center, who was fired from her housekeeping job at the JW Marriott Santa Monica Le Merigot hotel. The hotel’s operator, Columbia Sussex, received tens of millions of dollars in PPP loans. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Rep. Katie Porter (D-Irvine) and seven of her Democratic colleagues issued a letter Tuesday urging the SBA to investigate how a hotel conglomerate that owns or operates at least 50 hotels spent the money it received — as much as $63 million — from the Paycheck Protection Program.

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The group of lawmakers said in the letter that

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BERLIN (Reuters) – German prosecutors said on Tuesday they were dropping a money-laundering investigation against managers at Deutsche Bank

, over its relations with Danske Bank’s

Estonian subsidiary, citing a lack of evidence.

The economic crimes unit at the Frankfurt Prosecutor’s Office also fined Deutsche Bank 13.5 million euros ($15.9 million) for being slow to report suspected money laundering in more than 600 cases.

The case related to a whistleblower’s claims that Danske had handled 200 billion euros in suspicious payments from Russia and other ex-Soviet republics between 2007 and 2015 – the bulk of which were processed by Deutsche Bank.

Deutsche Bank, which broke off its relationship with Danske in 2015, has consistently denied wrongdoing.

“With the end to proceedings, it is clear that there were no criminal lapses on the part of Deutsche Bank or its staff,” board member Stefan Simon said in a statement.

The fine relates

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