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The Saint Viator Alumni Association is hosting a free Loyal Hearts Business Forum event for Saint Viator and Sacred Heart of Mary graduates, and current and past parents, in which Saint Viator alumni will share ideas and techniques they’ve used to shift their work and adapt to the current pandemic environment. The event, “Pivoting in a Pandemic World,” will take place via Zoom on October 22 at 6 p.m. CT.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many businesses to close, temporarily or permanently, and others have been forced to find creative new ways to operate,” said Jim Platania, Jr., the Saint Viator Alumni Association board chairman. “We hope this event will help business owners and professionals learn from alumni who have found ways to pivot their business during these trying times.”

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

Speakers include Steve Zaleski (’04), real estate broker at Compass and restaurateur; Jerry Cataldo (’77), president and CEO of Hostmark

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Tech, finance, media and other executives are calling on Americans to stay cool during a heated election season. “The health of our economy and markets depends on the strength of our democracy,” the LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman said in a statement signed by more than 50 business leaders, provided first to DealBook. The group, convened by the Leadership Now Project, also includes Eddie Fishman, the chief operating officer of D.E. Shaw; Seth Klarman, the C.E.O. of Baupost Group; Lisa Lewin, the C.E.O. of General Assembly; Marissa Mayer, the former Yahoo and Google executive; and Alan Patricof, the founder of Apax and Greycroft.

The executives expressed support for three key principles:

• “Every vote will be counted,” and election officials should “encourage patience” during potentially protracted counts of absentee ballot.

• The news

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by Erik Sherman

Going once, going twice—the winners of this year’s Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences are two Stanford economists whose work lets the world make mobile phone calls, switch on a light, and buy and sell on eBay.

Robert Wilson and Paul Milgrom, are famous for their groundbreaking work on auction theory. They took the 2,500-year-old practice of selling goods to the highest bidder and transformed how they worked and how the world looked at a result.

One of the major areas they developed was analysis of how the rules that govern auctions affect the efficiency of the outcomes—how bidders get the value they want, sellers maximize their income, and the process can happen more easily and quickly. Then they found ways to move beyond the fast-talking and gavel-banging stereotype of an auction and into many new types that new rules could enable.

“Sometimes the invisible hand of the

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owasso chamber

Brady Deaton, business developer at Paul David Restoration in Tulsa (left), and McKenzie Dildy, director of development for Arubah Community Clinic in Collinsville, met at the Owasso Chamber of Commerce’s Business Over Breakfast Tuesday morning. ART HADDAWAY/Owasso Reporter


Brady Deaton and McKenzie Dildy may live in different parts of Tulsa County, but they have Owasso to thank for their newfound friendship.

Deaton, business developer at Paul David Restoration in Tulsa, and Dildy, director of development for Arubah Community Clinic in Collinsville, met at the Owasso Chamber of Commerce’s Business Over Breakfast Tuesday morning.

The two were among over a dozen local business leaders to convene at Prosperity Bank off of 96th Street as part of the bimonthly event, with Tuesday serving as the Chamber’s first gathering since March due to COVID-19.

It was also Deaton’s and Dildy’s first time attending a Business Over Breakfast in Owasso, which gave them an

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Growing up outside of Tokyo, Chef Kenji Miyaishi’s mother used to send him off with bento boxes of onigiri rice balls, karaage fried chicken, tamago-yaki egg omelets and vegetables from her garden.

Now, as he’s pivoted his upscale restaurant in Napa, California, to prepare and deliver bento boxes amid the pandemic, he says he aims to serve with the same values of precision, culture and care his mother did.

Chef Kenji Miayishi. Credit Bob McClenahan (Bob McClenahan)
Chef Kenji Miayishi. Credit Bob McClenahan (Bob McClenahan)

Bento boxes can be traced back to the Kamakura period in 12th century Japan, and this year — with restaurants relying on takeout and delivery — they’ve become a relevant and culturally authentic way for kaiseki chefs across the country to stay in business.

And some chefs say, at a time of uncertainty, the boxes have also come to symbolize nurturing and comfort.

“Bento is usually made by a mother for her children

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CLOSE

Alabama A&M University students won the Ally Financial Moguls in the Making competition, each winning a $10,000 scholarship and an internship at the company. (Photo: Ally Financial)

Several historically Black colleges and universities students walked away with internships and thousands of dollars in scholarships after creating business plans that would solve Detroit-based problems in a competition. 

The second annual HBCU business plan pitch competition, called Moguls in the Making, was hosted Sunday by Ally Financial Inc., which is based in Detroit. Ally Financial partnered with the Thurgood Marshall College Fund and Big Sean’s the Sean Anderson Foundation to host the event. 

Excitement was shared virtually Sunday evening as teams from 11 HBCUs had the opportunity to

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If you’re like me, in my search to find the right coach, I dream about enlisting someone at the top of their field – the Stedman Graham or Steve Jobs of our profession. Conventional wisdom suggests that if you want to get good at something, you need to learn from the best. But does this always hold true?



Warren Buffett, Bill Gates are posing for a picture


© Dimitrios Kambouris | Getty Images


This week I visited with management expert Roger Connors, perhaps most known as the best-selling co-author of The Oz Principle and several other workplace accountability books. Most recently he’s heading up a new organization called Zero to Ten and his newest book, Get a Coach | Be a Coach, will be available soon.

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We talked about the unexplored magic in mentoring – or being mentored – with individuals just one or two levels above or below us in a particular realm. It may be

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Growing up outside of Tokyo, Chef Kenji Miyaishi’s mother used to send him off with bento boxes of onigiri rice balls, karaage fried chicken, tamago-yaki egg omelets and vegetables from her garden.

Now, as he’s pivoted his upscale restaurant in Napa, California, to prepare and deliver bento boxes amid the pandemic, he says he aims to serve with the same values of precision, culture and care his mother did.

Kenzo Napa Head Chef Kenji Miayishi.Bob McClenahan

Bento boxes can be traced back to the Kamakura period in 12th century Japan, and this year — with restaurants relying on takeout and delivery — they’ve become a relevant and culturally authentic way for kaiseki chefs across the country to stay in business.

And some chefs say, at a time of uncertainty, the boxes have also come to symbolize nurturing and comfort.

“Bento is usually made by a mother for her children

Read More

In 2019, $130 billion was spent on digital advertising alone, as major retailers, consumer packaged goods companies (CPG), and media outlets embraced the ever-online customer. Despite these massive digital marketing budgets driving global ad campaigns, many marketers still lack the confidence to answer the age-old question: Is my campaign working?

Alex Yastrebenetsky and Michael Loban wrote Crawl, Walk, Run to be the practical guide for navigating each stage of analytics maturity, taking readers step-by-step through an analytics maturity framework to achieve greater efficiency and increased confidence in their marketing decisions. I recently caught up with Alex to learn what inspired him and Michael to write the book, along with his favorite idea he shares with readers in the book.

Published with permission from the author.

What happened that made you decide to write the book? What was the exact moment when you realized these ideas needed to get out there?

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One of the most telling definitions of entrepreneurship, courtesy of Howard Stevenson, a professor emeritus at Harvard Business School, is also one of the simplest: the pursuit of opportunity beyond the resources controlled.

And let’s face it: In 2020, no one has been controlling anything. Whether it’s a pandemic, government-mandated business shutdowns, or unheard-of forest fires, the uncontrollable has erupted at a global level and filtered down to the trivial details of daily life.

But, as Stevenson tells us, if anyone has experience with the uncontrollable, it’s entrepreneurs. In spite of the challenges, entrepreneurs continue to do what they do best: improvise, adapt, and make something from nothing.

The women on Inc.‘s annual Female Founders 100 list show how to do just that. As our staff reports on startups and small businesses throughout the year, these are the women whose names keep reappearing. They are the most inspiring, the

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