The world’s biggest private messaging service has created the UK’s first ‘WhatsApp High Street’ – allowing small and medium-sized companies to connect easily with their customers. Businesses taking part can now communicate on issues like social distancing in small premises, new opening hours, stock issues, table reservations or reduced menus. Twelve firms on Market Street, in Watford, Herts., have joined the pilot programme, with experts from WhatsApp training them to use its free-to-download Business app as a shopfront for their products and services.

Among those taking part is Underground Tattoo, a local tattoo parlour which also offers piercings.

Jamie, from Underground Tattoo, said: “Getting a tattoo or piercing is a really personal experience.

“Customers like to talk it through and build up a rapport with the artist or body piercer So setting Underground Tattoo up on WhatsApp Business is a no brainer.

“It means we can continue to build relationships

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Hello everyone! Welcome to this weekly roundup of Business Insider stories from executive editor Matt Turner. Subscribe here to get this newsletter in your inbox every Sunday.

Read on for news about the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, WhatsApp-tracking apps that are letting people figure out when you’re sleeping, how home-listing site Zumper weeded out thousands of Section 8 renters, and a toxic culture in Yelp’s Phoenix office. 

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

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The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is likely to make intense political polarization in the US even more severe.

Ginsburg’s death opened up a vacancy on the Supreme Court that President Trump said he will fill as quickly as possible. But a new national survey from Insider found that most respondents disagree with the plan to fill the seat as soon as possible. You can get the latest on the response to

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WhatsApp has revealed six previously undisclosed vulnerabilities in its service as part of its newly-published security advisory.

The Facebook-owned messaging service has created a dedicated page for its security advisories that details previously found vulnerabilities and security advisories for users.

“This advisory page provides a comprehensive list of WhatsApp security updates and associated Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE),” WhatsApp said.

Some vulnerabilities are found by the messaging service’s own security team, while others are reported under the Facebook Bug Bounty Program.

In a newly-published update for the year, the messaging service detailed various vulnerabilities that it had resolved, many of which could have allowed attackers to remotely access a user’s device or escalate privileges.

For instance, it found a stack overflow vulnerability that “could have allowed arbitrary code execution when playing a specially-crafted push to talk message.” The bug was found in the app’s Android version prior to v2.20.35, WhatsApp

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In March when coronavirus started spreading in India, Abhishek Sayam was forced to close his two Books By Kilo stores on the outskirts of Mumbai. The company, which sells books by weight and not by printed cost, also had to stop holding exhibitions to avoid putting customers and teammates at risk. “Due to (the) uncertain nature of lockdowns and curfews we can not confirm the date of delivery,” reads a popup on Books By Kilo’s website.

This situation could have led Sayam’s two-year-old venture to collapse. But like for many other entrepreneurs, technology came to his rescue.

Books By Kilo has seen a 40% increase in sales and customer interactions since March thanks to WhatsApp Business, a free-to-download mobile app that acts as a storefront for small businesses on the world’s largest instant messaging app. Sayam has been using the app since 2018, but during the lockdown, the app was

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In March when coronavirus started spreading in India, Abhishek Sayam was forced to close his two Books By Kilo stores on the outskirts of Mumbai. The company, which sells books by weight and not by printed cost, also had to stop holding exhibitions to avoid putting customers and teammates at risk. “Due to (the) uncertain nature of lockdowns and curfews we can not confirm the date of delivery,” reads a popup on Books By Kilo’s website.

This situation could have led Sayam’s two-year-old venture to collapse. But like for many other entrepreneurs, technology came to his rescue.

Books By Kilo has seen a 40% increase in sales and customer interactions since March thanks to WhatsApp Business Solution (WBS), a free-to-download mobile app that acts as a storefront for small businesses on the world’s largest instant messaging app. Sayam has been using WBS since 2018, but during

Read More