By Katharine Houreld



a group of items on a table: FILE PHOTO: Somali Puntland forces display weapons seized in a boat on the shores of the Gulf of Aden in the city of Bosasso


© Reuters/STRINGER
FILE PHOTO: Somali Puntland forces display weapons seized in a boat on the shores of the Gulf of Aden in the city of Bosasso

NAIROBI (Reuters) – Somali money transfer companies moved more than $3.7 million in cash between suspected weapons traffickers in recent years, including to a Yemeni under U.S. sanctions for alleged militant links, according to a report seen by Reuters.

The findings by a Geneva-based research group, the Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime, could further complicate attempts by Somali transfer companies to retain access to international banking services.

Though they provide a lifeline to millions in the anarchic Horn of Africa nation, few banks will do business with them because of the risk of falling foul of international transparency and anti-money laundering regulations.

Asked about the report, the Central Bank of Somalia, which regulates money transfer firms, said it was

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NAIROBI (Reuters) – Somali money transfer companies moved more than $3.7 million in cash between suspected weapons traffickers in recent years, including to a Yemeni under U.S. sanctions for alleged militant links, according to a report seen by Reuters.

The findings by a Geneva-based research group, the Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime, could further complicate attempts by Somali transfer companies to retain access to international banking services.

Though they provide a lifeline to millions in the anarchic Horn of Africa nation, few banks will do business with them because of the risk of falling foul of international transparency and anti-money laundering regulations.

Asked about the report, the Central Bank of Somalia, which regulates money transfer firms, said it was unaware of the transfers but would investigate and was in general making progress in countering terrorism financing.

Contacted by Reuters, the four companies said they adhered to global “know your

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FILE PHOTO: A man walks past a sign at an AstraZeneca site in Macclesfield
  • AstraZeneca shares fell on Wednesday, following a 6% drop on Tuesday, after the pharmaceutical company paused its COVID-19 vaccine trial following a suspected severe adverse reaction.
  • Shares in the drugs company, a leader in the race for a vaccine, were down by around 1% on London’s FTSE 100 index in mid-morning trading on Wednesday.
  • Pausing the phase-three study is a “routine action which has to happen whenever there is a potentially unexplained illness in one of the trials,” the company said in a statement to CNBC.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

AstraZeneca shares fell on Wednesday, extending a 6% fall on Tuesday, after the pharmaceutical company halted its coronavirus vaccine trial following a suspected severe adverse reaction from a participant.

Shares in the company, a front-runner in the race for a coronavirus vaccine,

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FRANKFURT (Reuters) – Volkswagen’s

luxury sports vehicle unit Porsche AG has launched an internal investigation into the suspected manipulation of petrol engines, German weekly Bild am Sonntag (BamS) reported.

Porsche has informed Germany’s automotive watchdog KBA, the Stuttgart prosecutor’s office, as well as U.S. authorities of suspected illegal changes to hardware and software that could affect exhaust systems and engine components, the paper said.

“Porsche is regularly and continuously reviewing technical and regulatory aspects of its vehicles,” a Porsche spokesman said. “As part of such internal examinations Porsche has identified issues and has, just like in the past, proactively informed authorities.”

The spokesman said that the issues relate to vehicles developed several years ago, adding that there were no indications that current production was affected. The carmaker is working closely with authorities, he said.

BamS, not citing where it obtained the information, said that engines developed between 2008 and 2013

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