New research on cats show that they can spread, as well as get infected, by the SARS-CoV-2 more easily than dogs.

However, the lead author of the research suggested that there is still no proof of the cats-to-human transmission. But, these feline creatures can contract the virus from their owners.

Also read: https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/news/variety/drug-that-destroys-coronavirus-in-cats-could-destroy-covid-19-in-humans-study/article32472719.ece

The study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Lead author Angela Bosco-Lauth said in a statement: “People should not worry about getting Covid-19 from their cats; rather, cats should worry about getting it from their people. We have no evidence to date that cat-to-human transmission has occurred and we believe that cats pose a very low health risk to humans.”

Also read: https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/news/world/dogs-to-sniff-out-covid-at-helsinki-airport/article32693672.ece

She cautioned pet owners that they have to be very careful while interacting with their pet cats.

For the research, Bosco-Lauth and her team infected cats and dogs by

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The workout culture at home is gaining ground globally due to restrictions in movement and prolonged shutdown of gymnasiums owing to the coronavirus.

However, according to new research commissioned by doctors at the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), there are certain exercises that should be avoided that may increase the chance of catching coronavirus. This includes High Intense Interval Training (HIIT).

Report findings

The report published in the journal Current Sports Medicine Reports, ACSM indicated that high-intensity exercise may result in overstrain which can lead to immune system dilapidation. This may make workout enthusiasts susceptible to getting infected with the virus.

Researchers also cautioned people who fall in the high-risk category to refrain from performing “exhaustive exercises, overreaching, and overtraining.”

The study mentioned that participating in unusually high exercise workloads with the associated physiological stress is linked to transient immune dysfunction and an elevated ARI (Acute Respiratory Infection) risk.

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