The ongoing pandemic has changed everything. In the last few months, the world has evolved into living with the ‘new normal’. This has impacted businesses, irrespective of their size or sector. But in the case of small and medium businesses (SMBs), the impact has been particularly severe. For a country like India, where SMBs generate nearly a third of its GDP, their swift rebound is paramount.

Not only do SMBs provide employment to millions, they are also important suppliers and customers to larger enterprises. In recent decades, SMBs’ entrepreneurial spirit has driven much of India’s growth — which is why they are so critical to economic recovery as the nation grapples with the impact of the pandemic.

With restrictions easing, businesses are opening again. But things don’t look to be very pleasant. Recent media reports suggest that 30-40 per cent of restaurants may never open again. And it seems to

Read More

A low-rise building in a trendy part of east London bears testament to the far-reaching impact of the coronavirus crisis on the UK’s smallest companies.

The building’s central atrium has a series of doors leading to its 98 offices and workshops, but many are locked and the blinds on windows pulled down.

It highlights how some workers will never return to Brickfields, the building in Hoxton owned by Workspace, a FTSE 250 property company. About 10 companies that were tenants have either left or are due to leave, while another eight have cut the amount of space they are using in the building.

However Brickfields is far from a ghost town: many companies in the building have so far survived the crisis because of emergency government support, and a few are thriving amid the pandemic.

Businesses have made good use of chancellor Rishi Sunak’s menu of assistance, led by the

Read More


This episode contains strong language.

Jack Nicas, a technology reporter for The New York Times, moved to Oakland, Calif., five years ago. When he arrived, he set out to find a bar of choice. It quickly became the Hatch.

Unpretentious, cheap and relaxed, the Hatch was a successful small business until the coronavirus hit.

After the announcement in March that California would order bars and restaurants to shut down, Jack decided to follow the fortunes of the Hatch. Over six months, he charted the struggle to keep the tavern afloat and the hardship suffered by its staff.

“I can’t afford to be down in the dumps about it,” Louwenda Kachingwe, the Hatch’s owner, told Jack as he struggled to come up with ideas to keep the bar running during the shutdown. “I have to be

Read More

(MENAFN – The Conversation) Walk around any town or city this autumn and you will find a range of shuttered businesses next door to others which have continued to operate during the pandemic. Some have responded rapidly with agility and creativity throughout 2020, enabling them to keep going and even excel at what they do. But what does it actually mean to be creative in these challenging times? And how do some businesses succeed while others fail?

The truth is we have all been living in a ‘ VUCA ‘ world for some time – a world filled with volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity. The ever-changing operating requirements – environmental regulations, new technologies, Brexit uncertainty, for example – already imposed challenges for businesses and now, with coronavirus, dramatic shifts in consumer behaviour have put considerable strain on companies, and will continue to do so post-pandemic.

Right now, coming up with

Read More

Jill Justin is trying to figure out the next move for her business, Jill Justin Dance Alliance, after the pandemic cut business in half.

Source: Jill Justin

Jill Justin had to think fast when the coronavirus pandemic hit.

As the owner of Jill Justin Dance Alliance in Middlesex County, New Jersey, she went from having close to 500 students taking classes seven days a week to shutting her studio doors.

After taking some time to regroup and change her business model, Justin started offering Zoom classes and asked those who could afford it to continue paying tuition. Her revenue dropped by 50%.

Now that her business is back open with restrictions like masks and six-feet of social distancing, and at 50% capacity, Justin is wondering about her next move.

“Should I return to my corporate career or take on a part-time position?” she said. “Should I reinvent my business even

Read More

(Bloomberg Markets) — Building a business is never easy, but 2020 has been a unique calamity. In the U.S., which has suffered more Covid-19 deaths than any other nation, the economy entered its worst downturn in generations. Although central bank stimulus and government programs such as the Paycheck Protection Program have helped cushion the blow, a return to growth will depend on the creativity and resilience of millions of entrepreneurs and business managers.

Loading...

Load Error

For a glimpse at how it’s going, Bloomberg Markets talked to leaders of four small businesses and two arts organizations over several months. Their journeys have all been different, but they share a spirit of perseverance often lost in economic statistics. These are their stories.

LENORE ESTRADA Owner

Three Babes Bakeshop

FOUNDED 2011

HEADQUARTERS  San Francisco

PRE-CORONAVIRUS EMPLOYEES  26

EMPLOYEES NOW  13

YoY REVENUE  -42%

PPP LOAN  $143,000

PPP RAN OUT  July

When Google

Read More

Adds background, detail

LONDON, Oct 1 (Reuters)Britain’s Rolls-Royce RR.L said it planned to raise 2 billion pounds ($2.6 billion) from shareholders, 1 billion pounds from the bond market and secure further loans to rebuild its balance sheet after COVID-19.

The pandemic has battered Rolls’s finances as airlines pay the company according to how many hours its engines fly in wide-body jets. Worries that a recovery in travel will take years have pushed its share price down by 80% this year.

Rolls said on Thursday that the 10 for 3 heavily discounted rights issue was fully underwritten at 32 pence per share, a 41% discount to the closing price of 130 pence per share on Wednesday.

In May, the company said it would cut 9,000 jobs as a result of the pandemic and its finances have been the subject of media speculation since.

“The capital raise announced today

Read More

HAVANA (Reuters) – From a restaurant mixing take-away cocktails to a cosmetics company delivering home-made products by bicycle, Cuba’s entrepreneurs – no strangers to hardship – are coping with the coronavirus shutdown in innovative ways.

Except for a few offshore resorts, Cuba’s Communist government has kept its borders shut for seven months to curb the spread of infection and recently placed the capital Havana in lockdown for a second time due to a local surge.

The drastic action has limited deaths from COVID-19 to just 122 on the island of 11 million people, but has all but shut down the vital tourist industry – adding to economic woes from decades-old U.S. sanctions tightened by President Donald Trump.

In Havana’s colonial district, mixing restored historic buildings and urban decay, the once-thronging streets are empty of tourists and scrawled “closed” signs are on the doors of many

Read More

By Marc Frank and Anett Rios



a person holding a bottle of wine: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Havana


© Reuters/ALEXANDRE MENEGHINI
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Havana

HAVANA (Reuters) – From a restaurant mixing take-away cocktails to a cosmetics company delivering home-made products by bicycle, Cuba’s entrepreneurs – no strangers to hardship – are coping with the coronavirus shutdown in innovative ways.

Except for a few offshore resorts, Cuba’s Communist government has kept its borders shut for seven months to curb the spread of infection and recently placed the capital Havana in lockdown for a second time due to a local surge.

The drastic action has limited deaths from COVID-19 to just 122 on the island of 11 million people, but has all but shut down the vital tourist industry – adding to economic woes from decades-old U.S. sanctions tightened by President Donald Trump.

In Havana’s colonial district, mixing restored historic buildings and urban decay, the once-thronging streets are empty of tourists

Read More

Navigating the coronavirus pandemic hasn’t been easy for business owners. Serial entrepreneur Bobbi Brown is no exception.



a woman wearing glasses and smiling at the camera: Bobbi Brown, who left her eponymous cosmetics company in 2016, is now founder and CEO of Beauty Evolution.


© Provided by CNBC
Bobbi Brown, who left her eponymous cosmetics company in 2016, is now founder and CEO of Beauty Evolution.

The beauty icon, who sold her eponymous cosmetics company to Estée Lauder in 1995, is now founder and CEO of Beauty Evolution, a lifestyle and content company. 

Loading...

Load Error

“Parts have definitely been frustrating,” Brown said of the pandemic. That includes things such as being physically separated from her team.

Yet she isn’t letting those frustrations get to her. 

1. Focus on the positive

“Mostly, I’ve been focusing on the positive — the power of Zoom calls, virtual [public relations] opportunities, Instagram Lives, and having the time and space to connect with people I would’ve never met,” she said.

The self-made millionaire certainly isn’t a stranger to embracing change. She walked

Read More