Hong Kong’s leader must include measures in the coming policy address that centre on ramping up construction of public housing, and impose rent controls to improve living conditions for low-income residents, a human rights advocacy group has said.

A survey conducted by the Society for Community Organisation (SoCO) found that low-income residents renting 18 sq ft bed spaces were paying more than double the rent per square foot as those living in 160 sq ft private flats.

“As such a developed society, it is quite unreasonable that we do not have rent controls,” SoCO community organiser Sze Lai-shan said. “This means landlords can choose to raise rents to any amounts or kick their tenants out at any time, and we receive reports [of that] almost every week.”

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Head of Beijing’s liaison office

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Warren, RI — Crazy Computers is open for business. That wasn’t the case for two months as they had to shut down because of the health risks posed by the coronavirus. While their “Closed” sign has gone away, the struggles have not.

The business, which has been in Warren since 1998, is a small technology shop that serves the community by repairing computers. They also solve other issues posed by a variety of digital devices and networks.

Even with support from the CARES Act, the 2-month shutdown was a tough storm for part-owner Cezary Eliminowicz to weather. With the door closed and all business put on hold, they were not bringing in any revenue.

“Everyday is touch and go,” Eliminocowicz said. “There is less walk-in traffic and no more housecalls. We have work,” he added, “not like it was before, but still enough to keep us afloat.”

As the pandemic

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On Hartford’s Front Street, Infinity Music Hall stands idle, its new owners hunkered down until coronavirus restrictions on live performances are significantly lifted and the venue can return to closer to normal.



a group of people standing in front of a building: Tyler Grill, at left, and David Rosenfeld, are partners in Infinity Music Hall on Front Street in downtown Hartford. The performance space has been closed since the pandemic struck Connecticut in March. The partners say they will not attempt to reopen until there is a significant easing in restrictions prohibiting large public gatherings.


© Mark Mirko / Hartford Courant/Hartford Courant/TNS
Tyler Grill, at left, and David Rosenfeld, are partners in Infinity Music Hall on Front Street in downtown Hartford. The performance space has been closed since the pandemic struck Connecticut in March. The partners say they will not attempt to reopen until there is a significant easing in restrictions prohibiting large public gatherings.



a person sitting at a table looking at a laptop: Tyler Grill, at left,, with partner Dave Rosenfeld, works on his computer in the empty bar area at Infinity Music Hall on Front Street which has been closed by the pandemic.


© Mark Mirko / Hartford Courant/Hartford Courant/TNS
Tyler Grill, at left,, with partner Dave Rosenfeld, works on his computer in the empty bar area at Infinity Music Hall on Front Street which has been closed by the pandemic.

All along Front Street businesses are watching, waiting and wondering when people will return. The COVID-19 outbreak has dealt a

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Stocks tumbled on Friday, closing out a rocky week on a down note as big tech stocks extend a weeklong sell-off — which dragged down all of Wall Street in spite of encouraging developments in the economy.

In recent sessions, high profile tech stocks like Amazon (AMZN), Facebook (FB) and Apple (AAPL) have slumped sharply after hitting record highs. The sector’s rout led the Nasdaq to its worst levels since July 31, and Friday saw the bellwether shed nearly 2% intraday. Meanwhile, the S&P logged losses that pushed it to a six week low. All three of the major market indexes have fallen for three weeks straight.

Apple, which wowed the market with its bundle of new service-oriented products this week, suffered its third consecutive week of declines — the first time that’s happened since May 2019, and is now down over 20% from its all time high.

Price action

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People walk by the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on May 18, 2020 in New York City.

Spencer Platt | Getty Images

U.S. stock futures rose on Sunday night after a sell-off in tech shares led to the market’s first back-to-back weekly declines in months.

Dow Jones Industrial Average futures traded 161 points higher, 0.6%. The S&P 500 also climbed 0.6% and Nasdaq 100 futures were up by nearly 1%. 

Sentiment was lifted in part by news of Nvidia buying chip maker Arm Holdings from SoftBank for $40 billion. Nvidia will finance the deal through a combination of cash and common stock. 

The S&P 500 fell by 2.5% last week. It was the broader-market index’s worst one-week drop since June 26. That decline also marked the first time since May that the S&P 500 closed lower in two straight weeks.

Those losses were driven in large part by a steep

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NEW YORK (Reuters) – U.S. stocks closed lower after a choppy trading session on Thursday as heavyweight tech-related stocks resumed their decline following a sharp rebound the previous session, while elevated jobless claims reminded investors of a still-difficult recovery ahead.

Names that have rallied since March lows, such as Apple Inc, Microsoft Corp and Amazon.com, all fell at least 2.8%.

Tesla Inc rose 1.4%, initially helping to limit the Nasdaq’s losses before the tech-heavy index’s slide widened.

The NYSE FANG+TM Index, which includes the core FAANG stocks, fell 1.8%, and all 11 sectors of the S&P 500 traded lower.

Wall Street’s main indexes bounced back sharply on Wednesday from their biggest three-day rout since March, as investors returned to tech-focused stocks that are deemed insulated from the current economic downturn.

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits remained high last week, Labor Department data showed, as layoffs

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Opening day brings a small bump in business to Cornwall’s, mostly from neighborhood regulars. But the initial rush would fizzle out soon after, leaving the family-owned pub just barely covering its costs.

Tovia Smith/NPR


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Tovia Smith/NPR

Few people have been looking forward to colleges reopening – and staying open — this fall, as much as the adults who run Cornwall’s Tavern in Boston’s Kenmore Square. A go-to for students and faculty at Boston University, the family-owned pub has been counting on the back-to-school crowds to help it survive. In an industry hard-hit by the pandemic, it’s a test Cornwall’s can’t afford to fail.

“It’s a frightening time,” said Pam Beale, who owns the place with her husband John. “It feels like the earth is moving under your feel all the time.”

After forty years in business, and four months shut down by the pandemic, Cornwall’s reopened

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Who’s to blame for the damage done to North Carolina’s small businesses during this year’s pandemic-induced recession?

In a Republican-sponsored roundtable Tuesday, a handful of small business owners in Charlotte pointed a finger at Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper.

And in a virtual roundtable, Democrats and other business owners blamed President Donald Trump.

The dueling events came amid a general election campaign when both men face tough re-election campaigns. And they spotlighted the problems that small businesses face five months into the lockdowns and other restrictions triggered by the coronavirus pandemic.

Through Aug. 9, revenue for Mecklenburg County’s small businesses had fallen nearly 26% this year, according to the Opportunity Insights Economic Tracker. Statewide it was down more than 12%.

“We’re losing the small-business character of Charlotte,” said restaurant owner Anthony Kearey.

Kearey joined state GOP Chair Michael Whatley, hotel owner Vinay Patel, small business owner Sonja Nichols, a candidate for

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Three months after Spain rushed to launch a minimum basic income scheme to fight a spike in poverty due to the coronavirus pandemic, the programme is at a dead-end because of an avalanche of applications.

The measure was a pledge made by Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez’s leftwing coalition government, which took office in January, bringing together his Socialist party with far-left Podemos as the junior partner.

The scheme — approved in late May — aims to guarantee an income of 462 euros ($546) per month for an adult living alone, while for families, there would be an additional 139 euros per person, whether adult or child, up to a monthly maximum of 1,015 euros per home. It is expected to cost state coffers three billion euros ($3.5 billion) a year.

The government decided to bring forward the launch of the programme because of the Covid-19 pandemic, which has hit Spain

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A member of Imperio Serrano Samba School gestures during their 2019 paradeImage copyright
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The celebration usually brings millions out onto the streets

They call it the greatest spectacle on earth and for Brazil, carnival is everything.

While Rio de Janeiro’s carnival is Brazil’s most famous, cities such as São Paulo have in the past few years been starting to make a name for themselves.

With a spectacle of such proportions, preparation is everything and samba schools would normally already be getting ready for next year’s carnival, due to be held in February 2021.

Currently, São Paulo’s carnival parade – the highlight of the festivities – has already been delayed by eight months until October 2021.

But depending on how the crisis unravels, there is no guarantee it will not be delayed further. There are question marks over what Rio’s plans are, too.

At this point of the year, Imperio da Casa Verde, one of São Paulo’s leading

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