By James Davey

LONDON (Reuters) – Dave Lewis steps down on Wednesday after six years as Tesco chief executive, during which he got Britain’s biggest retailer back on track after an accounting crisis, leaving new challenges for his successor Ken Murphy.

Murphy, 53, who was formerly at healthcare group Walgreens Boots Alliance , faces the long-term impact of the coronavirus crisis, a recession and possible disruption when Britain’s Brexit transition period finishes at the end of 2020.

Tesco was on its knees shortly after former Unilever executive Lewis, 55, joined in 2014 when an accounting scandal knocked millions off its profits and billions off its share price.

But by October last year, Lewis declared Tesco’s turnaround complete, its position as clear market leader among Britain’s supermarket groups reinforced.

Lewis received a total pay package of 6.4 million pounds ($8.2 million) in 2019-20.

Murphy, an Irishman who is taking on his

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LONDON (Reuters) – Dave Lewis steps down on Wednesday after six years as Tesco chief executive, during which he got Britain’s biggest retailer back on track after an accounting crisis, leaving new challenges for his successor Ken Murphy.

Murphy, 53, who was formerly at healthcare group Walgreens Boots Alliance

, faces the long-term impact of the coronavirus crisis, a recession and possible disruption when Britain’s Brexit transition period finishes at the end of 2020.

Tesco was on its knees shortly after former Unilever executive Lewis, 55, joined in 2014 when an accounting scandal knocked millions off its profits and billions off its share price.

But by October last year, Lewis declared Tesco’s turnaround complete, its position as clear market leader among Britain’s supermarket groups reinforced.

Lewis received a total pay package of 6.4 million pounds ($8.2 million) in 2019-20.

Murphy, an Irishman who is taking on his highest profile business

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NEW YORK CITY — High-income New Yorkers don’t necessarily think the city is “dead,” but their enthusiasm for living here is on life support, according to a new study.

A poll of city dwellers making $100,000 or more a year found 44 percent of them have considered moving in the past four months.

And the study commissioned by the Manhattan Institute and conducted by the Siena College Research Institute discovered those six-figure earners aren’t overwhelmingly positive about the city’s prospects.

Roughly two in five of those surveyed believe that the city is headed in the wrong direction, according to the study. They reported a steep decline in quality of life since the coronavirus pandemic struck in March.

“Looking ahead, 37% say that it is at least somewhat likely that they will not be living in the city within the next two years,” the study stated.

The study supports growing murmurs

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Dan Trigub, who for the last two years has led Uber Health, is leaving the ride-sharing giant to start his own health care company, he wrote in an email to his contacts, the text of which was shared with STAT. His last day with the company is Tuesday.

Trigub has steered Uber Health, which launched in 2018, through a period of rapid growth. Like rival Lyft, the company has built out a business focused on non-emergency medical transportation, using its platform to allow providers and patients to schedule rides to medical appointments. During Trigub’s tenure, Uber Health has partnered with more than 1,000 health care organizations to expand its medical transportation business.

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By Phionah Nassanga

After handing in her resignation letter, Nakato’s bosses, workmates and family thought she was crazy. Her workmates wondered then, who in the world quits their bank job to venture into a salon business.
Even with lots of unsolicited advice, Nakato was not about to change her mind. With her twin sister’s support, she was ready to cut her teeth in business.
“When I decided to quit, my family and friends were concerned. My mother asked me to seek advice from my uncles who had ventured into the salon business. But I decided to shut all voices and remain focused,” she reveals.
Prior to starting Afros and Mo, Nakato had worked in the banking institution for nine years. She says for the six years she served as a teller, all her workmates were being promoted, something that made her feel cheated and unappreciated.
She was later transferred to

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Among the myriad disruptions coronavirus has brought to Colorado’s schools over the last half year, keeping students at their desks — both virtual and actual — is shaping up to be the next big hurdle for education officials.

Official enrollment numbers for the 2020-21 academic year in the state’s 178 school districts won’t be tallied until October, but district leaders are doing what they can now to accommodate families that are struggling to navigate an educational system beset by a global health crisis. Schools receive funding based on the number of students they have, whether they’re learning online or in person. When kids leave for another school or homeschooling, money leaves, too.

For this academic year, the average per-pupil allocation is projected to be $8,077.

“If you have fewer kids, you’re going to have less revenue,” said Jennifer Okes, chief operating officer for the Colorado Department of Education.

And that’s

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With less than two weeks left in the California 2020 Legislative Session, state legislators have introduced bills to increase personal income tax on the highest earners and create a wealth tax that the bill’s sponsor said could still be collected from residents who flee the state.

“As a heads-up to my colleagues proposing the Wealth Tax Act, the U.S. Constitution is still in force here,” Assemblyman Kevin Kiley, R-Rocklin, said. “You can’t keep taxing people after they flee the state.”

AB 1253, with several cosponsors, would increase the top earners’ income tax from 13.3 percent to 16.8 percent and make the tax retroactive to Jan. 1.

If passed, high-income earners would pay an additional 1 percent on income over $1.18 million, another 3 percent on income over $2.36 million, and 3.5 percent on income over $5.9 million. The rates also would include inflation adjustments so that taxpayers pay more.

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Some of the indicators now flashing red:

  • More Americans are going hungry. “For the week that ended July 21, the most recent numbers available, roughly 29 million U.S. adults — about 12.1 percent — said their household sometimes or often didn’t have enough to eat the preceding seven days, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities,” Hannah Denham and Taylor Telford write, citing Census Bureau data.
  • Renters face evictions. “Nearly 15 million renters said they were behind on rent during the same period,” they report.
  • Small businesses are struggling. “Small-business data from the time management firm Homebase shows no improvement since the middle of the summer in employment or hours worked in crucial parts of the economy,” the New York Times’s Jeanna Smialek and Jim Tankersley write. “Job postings from the online recruiting site Indeed slipped backward this week for the first time since May.”
  • A staggering
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  • Melania Trump avoided holding President Donald Trump’s hand as he reached for hers while they were leaving Air Force One on Sunday.
  • The footage prompted debate online about whether she was shunning her husband or simply trying to hold down her dress in windy weather.
  • Numerous reports have suggested that the Trumps’ marriage is under strain. A recent biography said Melania Trump delayed moving to the White House to force the president to renegotiate their prenup.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Melania Trump seemed to refuse to hold hands with President Donald Trump as they stepped off Air Force One on Sunday.

The footage, which was viewed millions of times on social media, shows the first lady and the president stepping off the aircraft at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland after a short flight from Morristown, New Jersey.

In the footage, the president twice attempts to hold her

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Working from home has created a unique opportunity for aspiring entrepreneurs. Suddenly you’re getting more time back in your day by skipping a commute, and lack of office distractions can lead to higher productivity and less working hours. 

With this new found time, you can launch the business you have always dreamt about. 

Launching a software business is straight forward enough. You can code your product on your computer, or outsource it to remote developers. But what if you want to launch a physical product? How can you do that from the confines of your home?

Look no further than newly launched Oklahoma Smokes, which was conceived, planned, and launched while both founders stayed at home. Here are their lessons you can apply to your next business idea. 

1. Ideate by studying the market and customer reviews

With any idea, you have to understand where there might be a

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