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Alabama A&M University students won the Ally Financial Moguls in the Making competition, each winning a $10,000 scholarship and an internship at the company. (Photo: Ally Financial)

Several historically Black colleges and universities students walked away with internships and thousands of dollars in scholarships after creating business plans that would solve Detroit-based problems in a competition. 

The second annual HBCU business plan pitch competition, called Moguls in the Making, was hosted Sunday by Ally Financial Inc., which is based in Detroit. Ally Financial partnered with the Thurgood Marshall College Fund and Big Sean’s the Sean Anderson Foundation to host the event. 

Excitement was shared virtually Sunday evening as teams from 11 HBCUs had the opportunity to

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Written by Nick Ackerman, co-produced by Stanford Chemist

Now that the majority of online brokers feature $0 commissions, it is important to focus on what features and services brokerages can offer to investors. One important discussion that has cropped up is participation in fund-sponsored DRIPs. These can allow investors discounted shares for participating in reinvestment plans. This happens when shares are trading at premium levels for a CEF. I would say the majority of CEF sponsors do have some sort of discounted DRIP available.

The only problem with this – some brokers don’t offer participation in these programs – some don’t even offer reinvestment at all. Additionally, the process for getting reinvestment going is different for different companies.

It is important to consider the importance of reinvesting. Even if it is just “manually” reinvesting. That would be taking the distributions as cash and investing where one sees fit. We have

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We asked the members of the 2020 Female Founders 100 for their best advice about coming up with, and testing, the idea that will form the foundation of your company. These are the highlights.

Malai
Question everyone about everything, and seek out reasons why you might be wrong. Then go with your gut.

SweetBio
If 90 percent of people think your idea is a good one, you’re already too late.

Anna Sheffield
It’s important to just take those bold leaps in the beginning, even if it is a little terrifying, and know that if you don’t make the perfect thing the first time, that’s OK. You’ll continue to improve. Starting on that path will lead you to where you need to go.

CQ Fluency
Think big, but choose wisely.

Everlywell
Remember that even some of the biggest companies didn’t realize, at the beginning, that they could address a global mass

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(Bloomberg Opinion) — Economists like to think of themselves as mathematicians — or, if feeling momentarily humbler, as physicists. This year’s winners of the Nobel Prize in economics, however, seem to conceive of themselves more as engineers. Like Alvin Roth and Lloyd Shapley, who won the prize in 2012, Paul Milgrom and Robert B. Wilson are specialists in “market design,” a field which, as Roth wrote in a famous paper, calls for “an engineering approach.”

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Roth argued that market designers should take bridge-builders as their exemplars: “Engineering is often less elegant than the simple underlying physics, but it allows bridges designed on the same basic model to be built longer and stronger over time, as the complexities and how to deal with them become better understood.”

The bridge that Milgrom and Wilson built was the 1994 auction of telecommunications spectrum by the Federal Communications Commission, later called “the

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(Bloomberg Businessweek) — You know that feeling of elation when you win an auction—say, a bidding war for a house—and how it’s immediately followed by that sinking feeling that you overpaid? That’s the winner’s curse. It’s a real thing. Once you stop to think, you realize there’s probably a good reason other people weren’t willing to pay as much as you did. By winning, you just lost.

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Understanding the winner’s curse, and how to avoid it, is part of the reason Stanford University economists Robert Wilson and Paul Milgrom won this year’s Nobel Prize in economics—formally called the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (PDF).

Wilson’s and Milgrom’s work is unusual in that it’s both theoretical and highly practical. The U.S. Federal Communications Commission raised more than $120 billion for taxpayers from 1994 through 2014 by selling off wireless frequencies using an auction

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If you just watch the news and the ads – and the social media posts – you could be forgiven the impression that the American political system has gone, well, nuts.

We have a president who realized in February that coronavirus was a huge threat, told the public the opposite, then in late September contracted the often-fatal illness through his own heedlessness – without ever changing his tune. We have a U.S. Senate majority leader who has dropped all pretense of legislating to concentrate on his single paramount goal: packing one more justice onto the Supreme Court.

It’s not that all this doesn’t have an effect on state politics, too. There is, for instance, Dr. Jay Allen, the Republicans’ latest challenger to 1st District Rep. Chellie Pingree.

The title, which appears on all his signs, is genuine. He’s a family physician with a practice in Waldoboro, affiliated with Maine Health

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Woodward said during his discussions with Trump, Trump consistently emphasized that Biden is impaired and has slowed down. Woodward agreed, in part.

 “He has slowed down a little bit. He’s hesitant on some things,” Woodward said. Conversely, “Trump just goes right to the throat.”

When asked about similarities and differences between President Richard Nixon and Trump and the impeachment proceedings earlier in the year, Woodward was unequivocal: “Nixon was a criminal and a proven criminal. No one has pinned a crime on Trump.”

A big difference, Woodward said, was the component of premeditation.

“A crime, as we know, required premeditation almost always. Particularly political crimes, you have to plot. Trump doesn’t plot. He doesn’t premeditate. It’s all the impulse,” he said.

When Robert Mueller began his special investigation, Woodward said he was pretty confident there would be no smoking gun because “Trump doesn’t think or act that way.”

When it

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The world of The Boys is getting larger thanks to the announcement that a spin-off focusing on young Supes-in-training is coming to Amazon Prime Video. But we can’t imagine the series will stop there – with several spin-offs probably filling fans’ dreams as we speak. Maybe a peek at Vought’s PR? Or a window into what goes on with the making of Dawn of the Seven? How about a Black Noir spin-off?



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Yeah, how about a Black Noir spin-off? It’s an idea so tantalising and rich and shrouded in mystery, that we even put the premise to Nathan Mitchell, the actor who portrays the enigmatic member of the Seven. He has some serious ideas and even a title.

“I would call it ‘The Secret Life of Black Noir,’” Mitchell says. 

“A funny thing or a cool thing to play with Noir is to have him

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U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson (L) shares a laugh with financier Warren Buffett, Chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, at the Conference on U.S. Capital Market Competitiveness in Washington March 13, 2007.

  • Warren Buffett phoned Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson at the height of the 2008 financial crisis with a suggestion that likely saved the US economy from an even deeper recession.
  • The famed investor and Berkshire Hathaway CEO proposed the government plow capital directly into banks instead of only buying their distressed assets.
  • Paulson quickly gathered the bosses of the nation’s biggest banks and convinced them to accept billions of dollars in investment.
  • The Treasury demanded preferred stock paying chunky dividends, as well as stock warrants in return, emulating Buffett’s bailout of Goldman Sachs in September 2008.
  • Former President George W. Bush called it “probably the greatest financial bailout ever” and said it “probably saved a depression.”
  • Visit
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MMA fighters often pay huge tolls when engaging in violent brawls in the cage, and that’s something to which Markus Perez aspires.



Markus Perez faces UFC newcomer Dricus Du Plessis in Abu Dhabi.


© Jose Youngs, MMA Fighting
Markus Perez faces UFC newcomer Dricus Du Plessis in Abu Dhabi.

Perez had a several UFC fights cancelled over the past few months before booking a middleweight showdown with newcomer Dricus Du Plessis on Saturday night at UFC Fight Island 5 in Abu Dhabi. Dealing with so many frustrations has him eager to fulfill a longtime dream: a bloody war.

“Not that I see (my stand-up) as the best path to victory, but that’s how I want to fight,” Perez said in an interview with MMA Fighting. “I want to brawl, I want to punch him. I’m training for seven months, and now I’m going to grapple and take him down? I wanna fight, I want a brawl. I want to trade punches.”

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