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With bank earnings, Apple’s iPhone event, and the start of Amazon Prime Day on the schedule, Tuesday promised fireworks for the stock market. Instead, they delivered yawns as investors wrestled with continued Covid headlines and no stimulus.

The

S&P 500

finished down 0.6%, while the

Dow Jones Industrial Average

declined 157.71 points, or 0.6%, and the

Nasdaq Composite

dipped 0.1%. Yes, it was a down day, but not a big one.

“Stocks remained remarkably stable in the face of the scary COVID headlines and the global risk selloff, and this relative strength is even more impressive due to the lack of a stimulus deal,” writes Gorilla Trades strategist Ken Berman.

The same can’t be said for the companies that were making news.

Apple,

for instance, dropped 2.7% after releasing the details of its new iPhones. They were nice, but not exciting enough for a stock that had

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The Tuesday Market Minute

  • Global stocks mixed as concerns for a pause in Johnson & Johnson’s coronavirus vaccine trial is partly offset by solid China trade data.
  • Johnson & Johnson becomes the second “Operation Warp Speed’ trial to pause following the unexplained illness of one of its participants, raising questions about the efficacy of the andenovirus technique.
  • China posts a 13.2% surge in September imports, narrowing its trade surplus with the United States to $30.75 billion.
  • European stocks slide as lockdowns accelerate around the region and a key reading of investor sentiment from Germany disappoints.
  • Oil prices bump higher following the stronger-than-expected China trade data and output returns in Norway and the U.S. Gulf.
  • U.S. equity futures suggest a mixed open on Wall Street ahead of the unofficial start to the third quarter earnings season with updates expected from Johnson & Johnson, JPMorgan, Citigroup and Delta Airlines.

U.S. equity futures

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The Monday Market Minute

  • Global stocks rally as China markets roar, investors extend stimulus bets heading into the U.S. earnings season.
  • Around 31 companies will report this week, including the country’s biggest banks, with analysts expecting third quarter profits to fall 21% from last year.
  • Apple unveils is new line-up of 5G phones on Tuesday, the same day that Amazon will launch its annual ‘Prime Day’ shopping event.
  • President Trump renews call for stimulus deal, but confusion grips talks as both sides play politics 22 days ahead of the November elections.
  • Europe records 100,000 daily coronavirus cases, the highest tally since the pandemic began, in what is likely to be an omen for a second U.S. wave as domestic weather cools.
  • U.S. equity futures suggest a firmer open on Wall Street, following its best five-day stretch since August, ahead of big bank earnings and key consumer sentiment events in the
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“There is only one side to the stock market; and it is not the bull side or the bear side, but the right side.”Jesse Livermore

Anyone who follows the equity market realizes that they are faced with what I described last week as a foggy outlook in the near term. When that occurs, I try not to get swayed and then sidetracked into forgetting the long-term trends that are in place.

An investor has to be reactionary waiting for the market to give them clues, then reacting appropriately. I take my leads from price action, momentum, sentiment, and other indicators. All designed for me to decipher what the market is telling me. Never drifting too far from the one key that serves as the foundation of my current strategy. That is staying focused on the major trend that is in place, and that remains without question in favor

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If the Democrats sweep, they might seek to pass the original $3.4 trillion Heroes Act that cleared the House in May.


ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images

Sometimes the “why” is less important than the “what.” And that’s particularly true for investors right now.

Try explaining this: The

Dow Jones Industrial Average

advanced 904.09 points, or 3.3%, to 28,586.90 this past week, its second consecutive weekly gain, while the

S&P 500 index

rose 3.8%, to 3477.13, and the

Nasdaq Composite

gained 4.6%, to 11,579.94. Even more shocking, the small-company

Russell 2000

index climbed 6.4%, to 1637.55.

A possible stimulus package got much of the credit—and attention—this week, and there’s no doubt that the market would love to see a bill get passed. The Federal Reserve would too, as Fed Chairman Jerome Powell continued to call for the government to act sooner rather than later. But if it was all about stimulus,

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The Thursday Market Minute

  • Global stocks extend gains on U.S. stimulus hopes as lawmakers press ahead with talks of targeted support.
  • House Speaker Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Mnuchin remain engaged in negotiations as President Trump pushes for a ‘piecemeal’ deal before next month’s elections.
  • Weekly jobless claims could upend risk sentiment, but Wall Street is looking to extend its best week since August heading into the teeth of the third quarter earnings season.
  • European stocks extend gains, rising to a four-week high, even as coronavirus infections continue to surge and lockdown discussions accelerate as cooler weather sets in.
  • Oil prices edge higher following a surprise drawdown in U.S. gasoline stocks suggests a possible uptick in domestic energy demand.
  • U.S. equity futures suggest a firmer open on Wall Street ahead of weekly jobless claims numbers at 8:30 am Eastern time.

U.S. equity futures extended gains Thursday, pulling Wall Street benchmarks past

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The Wednesday Market Minute

  • Global stocks mixed as markets react to contradictory statements on stimulus from President Donald Trump.
  • Hours after ordering White House officials to stop negotiating with Democrats, Trump suggested he would sign a ‘stand alone’ bill to support airlines and small businesses.
  • White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow tells CNBC a piecemeal agreement on stimulus is a “low probability event”.
  • The U.S. dollar edges higher amid the stimulus uncertainty, made more complicated by the President’s coronavirus diagnosis, while benchmark 10-year Treasury yields hold at 0.764%.
  • Oil prices eases as the Energy Department trims near-term demand forecasts and Hurricane Delta slows to a category 3 storm as it heads towards the crude production areas of the Louisiana coast.
  • U.S. equity futures suggest a firmer open on Wall Street, with a 240 point gain priced for the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

U.S. equity futures powered ahead Wednesday, while the

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Stocks sank after President Trump scrapped stimulus talks while blasting House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s $2.4 trillion ask which is well above the $1.6 trillion Mnuchin was pushing for.

TRUMP REJECTS DEMS COVID-19 STIMULUS DEAL

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell nearly 400 points or 1.3%, while the S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite dropped 1.4% and 1.5%, respectively. 

Ticker Security Last Change Change %
I:DJI DOW JONES AVERAGES 27772.76 -375.88 -1.34%
I:COMP NASDAQ COMPOSITE INDEX 11154.603642 -177.88 -1.57%
SP500 S&P 500 3360.97 -47.66 -1.40%

The move curbs an effort by Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, who reiterated the need for more stimulus earlier today while warning of major risks to the economy without it.

“The recovery will be stronger and move faster if monetary

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The stock market was volatile on Tuesday after posting solid gains to start the week. The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJINDICES: ^DJI) was up 0.37% at 1:10 p.m. EDT today, outperforming the other major indexes.

One thing keeping the stock market in check could be comments from Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell, who warned on Tuesday that too little government aid would lead to a weak economic recovery. Congress has yet to agree on additional stimulus measures, and an agreement does not appear close.

Shares of Boeing (NYSE: BA) were moving in the wrong direction on Tuesday after the airplane manufacturer predicted a difficult decade ahead. Meanwhile, the stock of Walmart (NYSE: WMT) was little changed after the retailer announced an insurance brokerage business.

An airplane.

Image source: Getty Images.

Boeing forecasts tough years ahead

The coronavirus pandemic has greatly reduced demand for air travel. While the number of daily air passengers

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Shares advanced Tuesday in Asia after hopes for fresh economic stimulus helped Wall Street recover its losses from the initial shock of learning President Donald Trump had tested positive for the coronavirus.

Trump left the hospital after spending less than three days there, returning to the White House late Monday despite uncertainty over his recovery and risks that he is still infectious.

Shares rose in Tokyo, Hong Kong and Seoul. Markets in mainland China are closed for a weeklong holiday.DOW JUMPS 465 POINTS AS TRUMP RETURNS TO WHITE HOUSE

Overnight, the S&P 500 climbed 1.8%. Treasury yields and oil all rose after Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi both noted the importance over the weekend of additional support for the economy.

Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 rose 0.4% to 5,962.10 after the central bank kept its policies basically

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