Britain’s economy faces a double risk to recovery from a disorderly Brexit as the coronavirus pandemic drags down growth, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development has warned.



a car parked on a sidewalk: The UK car industry and food and textiles producers could be hit hardest by a disorderly Brexit, suffering a fall in exports of more than 30%.


© The Guardian
The UK car industry and food and textiles producers could be hit hardest by a disorderly Brexit, suffering a fall in exports of more than 30%.

On the eve of a critical EU leaders’ summit in Brussels, the influential Paris-based thinktank said the Covid crisis would further complicate a disorderly Brexit as companies were less prepared for the end of the transition period, having diverted attention away from leaving the EU.

It warned that failure to secure a free trade agreement before the UK leaves the Brexit transition period at the end of December would leave the economy 6.5% lower in the next few years than would have been the case if existing arrangements with the EU had been

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By William Schomberg

LONDON, Oct 14 (Reuters)Britain should do more to help the unemployed find work, and fixing the huge hole in its public finances can wait until a recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic is well under way, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development said.

The world’s sixth-biggest economy was at “a critical juncture” as the crisis threatens to worsen its productivity and inequality problems, and Brexit could also deal a major blow, the watchdog said in an annual report.

“Decisions made now about management of the COVID-19 crisis and future trade relationships will have a lasting impact on the country’s economic trajectory for the years to come,” it said.

Britain’s economy shrank by the most in the Group of Seven nations in the second quarter and the recovery lost momentum in August. Now the government is tightening its coronavirus restrictions, which will slow economy further

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WASHINGTON ― Over recent months, the U.S. Defense Logistics Agency has awarded hundreds of millions of dollars in contracts for the federal response to the coronavirus pandemic, but that’s not necessarily benefitting the Defense Department’s usual vendors.

In fact, the Pentagon contracting arm is seeing fewer small businesses in its traditional supplier base competing for contracts in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, the director of the DLA’s Office of Small Business Programs, Dwight Deneal, said Tuesday.

“Our percentages [of small business involvement] are as high as they’ve ever been over the past five years, but we are recognizing that the participation level from our supplier base’s standpoint has steadily declined,” Deneal said at a small business panel at the Association of the U.S. Army’s annual meeting, which was being conducted virtually.

“So [the DLA is] looking at the gaps in there and how do we strategically attack those areas

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In what will perhaps go down as the toughest period in India’s aviation history, the country’s two listed airlines, Indigo Airlines and SpiceJet, posted huge losses in the June 2020 quarter. IndiGo’s consolidated loss of ₹2,844 crore was its highest ever, while SpiceJet’s consolidated loss of ₹601 crore was among the largest it has posted so far. This is in stark contrast to the profits of ₹1,203 crore posted by IndiGo and ₹263 crore by SpiceJet in the year-ago period. SpiceJet reported its Q1 numbers on September 15 while IndiGo declared its Q1 numbers on July 29.

SpiceJet’s losses in the June quarter would have been higher by ₹141 crore, had it not accounted for ‘other income’ towards claims of reimbursement from Boeing for the grounding of its MAX aircraft.

The spread of Covid-19 and the consequent lockdown on flights meant that both SpiceJet and IndiGo flew passengers for just

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In response to COVID stay-at-home restrictions, consumers are increasingly turning to the internet to purchase household furniture and decor items. While this trend is bad news for the growing list of retailers closing doors such as Pier 1 and Sur La Table, it presents a tremendous opportunity for ecommerce retailers–especially those that help consumers filter through millions of options and then deliver the products through a direct-to-consumer model that keeps costs down.

Alfred Chehebar, founder of Genius Pack and CEO of Genius Brands LLC, a portfolio of digitally native ecommerce brands, is breaking into the online furniture market by launching ObjectsHQ, a direct-to-consumer furniture company promising “a new kind of ecommerce experience for modern furniture.”

The Market for Online Furniture Sales

The U.S. market for online household furniture is booming with annual revenues of $45.7 billion and annualized growth of 15.9% between 2015 and 2020, according to IBISWorld. But the

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Tammi: And I always pushed past him to get to my mom. She was my mentor, my cheerleader, my rock. Unfortunately, in June 2019, my mom had a fall at a camp in Pennsylvania, and the accident triggered her immune system to crash. She was in the hospital for five months before she died last November. Dad blamed me for taking her away when she should have been home taking care of him.

Jerry: Yep. I’m old-school.

Tammi: I felt like I’d lost both parents at once. But when COVID-19 hit, I was visiting Florida. My dad lives alone, and I couldn’t leave him, even though one of my sisters lives around the corner. So I moved in to Dad’s house. I cooked a feast every night, and after dinner, we’d set up the Bluetooth speaker on the patio and …

Jerry: … We’d listen to Sinatra, and I’d

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a man standing next to a bus: Buses sit parked at a transport hub at the SM Mall of Asia complex, operated by SM Prime Holdings Inc., in Pasay City, Metro Manila, the Philippines, on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. The Philippines is expanding its search for vaccine supplies as the spread of infections appears to slow in Southeast Asia’s virus epicenter.


© Bloomberg
Buses sit parked at a transport hub at the SM Mall of Asia complex, operated by SM Prime Holdings Inc., in Pasay City, Metro Manila, the Philippines, on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. The Philippines is expanding its search for vaccine supplies as the spread of infections appears to slow in Southeast Asia’s virus epicenter.

The Philippines will ease distancing rules in public transport and may allow more businesses to operate at full capacity, despite daily coronavirus cases hitting a four-week high.

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Buses and trains are allowed to sit passengers one-seat apart, even if it’s less than the one-meter distance the government requires, presidential spokesman Harry Roque said. Trains can also operate at half capacity, and commuters may eventually be allowed to sit beside each other as long as there’s a

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The Tuesday Market Minute

  • Global stocks mixed as concerns for a pause in Johnson & Johnson’s coronavirus vaccine trial is partly offset by solid China trade data.
  • Johnson & Johnson becomes the second “Operation Warp Speed’ trial to pause following the unexplained illness of one of its participants, raising questions about the efficacy of the andenovirus technique.
  • China posts a 13.2% surge in September imports, narrowing its trade surplus with the United States to $30.75 billion.
  • European stocks slide as lockdowns accelerate around the region and a key reading of investor sentiment from Germany disappoints.
  • Oil prices bump higher following the stronger-than-expected China trade data and output returns in Norway and the U.S. Gulf.
  • U.S. equity futures suggest a mixed open on Wall Street ahead of the unofficial start to the third quarter earnings season with updates expected from Johnson & Johnson, JPMorgan, Citigroup and Delta Airlines.

U.S. equity futures

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WASHINGTON/LONDON (Reuters) – The international community must do more to tackle the economic fallout of the COVID-19 crisis, the head of the International Monetary Fund said on Monday, publicly calling on the World Bank to accelerate its lending to hard-hit African countries.

FILE PHOTO: International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva makes remarks at an opening news conference during the IMF and World Bank’s 2019 Annual Fall Meetings of finance ministers and bank governors, in Washington, U.S., October 17, 2019. REUTERS/Mike Theiler

Some of the key events of the virtual and elongated annual meetings of the IMF and World Bank take place this week, with the most pressing issue how to support struggling countries.

“We are going to continue to push to do even more,” IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva said during an online FT Africa summit.

“I would beg for also more grants

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RADFORD, Va. (WDBJ) -At Radford’s City Council meeting on Monday, COVID-19 and the community’s response to the ever-evolving situation were front and center. They wanted to check in and see just how well they’re doing.



a large clock on a pole: At Radford’s City Council meeting on Monday, COVID-19 and the community’s response to the ever-evolving situation were front and center. They wanted to check in and see just how well they’re doing.


© Provided by Roanoke-Lynchburg WDBJ-TV
At Radford’s City Council meeting on Monday, COVID-19 and the community’s response to the ever-evolving situation were front and center. They wanted to check in and see just how well they’re doing.

“One of the things we promised we’d do was constantly monitor where we are with our COVID response and to make sure we’re being appropriate, find out if there’s anything else we need to do and to gage what we’re doing with everybody else,” said Mayor David Horton.

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“It’s not going to get tired so we can’t get tired and we can’t get complacent and we can’t get laxed,” said New River Health District Director Dr.

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