It wouldn’t be 2020 if the census went according to plan.

The census may seem like a boring, bureaucratic topic, but its impact on our daily lives is huge and the results have the potential to reinforce or redress racial and economic disparities.

The number of changes and controversies that have dogged the 2020 census could make your head spin.

First, there was the battle over including a citizenship question, which the Trump administration lost last year but not before it stoked fear of the census for undocumented immigrants. (The citizenship question controversy resulted in the Census Bureau having to spend millions to reassure immigrants that their data would not be shared with authorities.)

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Be counted

There is still time to fill out the census. You can fill out the form online at 2020census.gov or by phone at 844-330-2020.

The city of Seattle is hosting pop-up census outreach events

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Before the COVID-19 pandemic, North Texan households were probably seeing larger paychecks, according to data released this week by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The data comes from the American Community Survey. The Census Bureau noted that the information was collected before the pandemic, so it doesn’t reflect the outbreak’s blow to businesses across the country.

“American Community Survey estimates serve as ‘America’s mirror’ by providing a detailed look at how communities are changing and what must be done to meet the unique needs of their residents,” Donna Daily, chief of the American Community Survey Office, said in a written statement.

In the North Texas metropolitan area, which includes Dallas, Fort Worth and Arlington, median household income was $66,000, according to the 2019 data. That was up from $60,000 for the survey’s 2017 data.

The increase in North Texas fell in line with the national trend. National median household income was

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Before the COVID-19 pandemic, North Texan households were likely seeing larger paychecks, according to new data released this week by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The data comes from the American Community Survey. The Census Bureau noted that the information was collected before the coronavirus pandemic, indicating that the data does not reflect the effects of business shut down across the country.

“American Community Survey estimates serve as ‘America’s mirror’ by providing a detailed look at how communities are changing and what must be done to meet the unique needs of their residents,” Donna Daily, American Community Survey Office chief, said in a written statement.

In the North Texas metropolitan area, which includes Dallas, Fort Worth and Arlington, median household income was $66,000, according to the 2019 data. That’s up from $60,000 for the survey’s 2017 data.

The increase in income in North Texas fell in line with the national

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Michigan’s median income was up and poverty was down in 2019, according to numbers released today by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The state’s estimated median income for 2019 was $59,584, up 5.1% from $56,697 in 2018, while the overall poverty rate dropped from 14.1% in 2018 to 13% in 2019.

“It is important to note that data for the 2019 ACS was collected prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, and therefore does not reflect the economic changes that began in February 2020,” the Census Bureau said in its press release.

The 2019 data also may have been somewhat skewed by the pandemic. Interviews for this year’s income and poverty report were disrupted by the virus, the Census Bureau said, and the responses collected before the disruption were more likely to come from households with higher education and income levels.

Once inflation is factored in, Michigan remains below pre-recessions levels for median

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The nation’s median household income increased nearly 7% between 2018 and 2019, to more than $68,700 — among the highest increases on record — while the nation’s poverty rate decreased a little more than 1 percentage point during the period, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Tuesday.

Bureau officials noted the 2019 data doesn’t reflect the impact of COVID-19, which took serious hold in New York in March, or the recession that hit the country in February.

“These statistics are largely of historical interest right now because the situation is so different” because of the coronavirus pandemic, said John Rizzo, a Stony Brook University professor and the chief economist for the Long Island Association, the region’s largest business group.

David Waddington, chief of the census bureau’s Social, Economic and Housing Statistics Division, noted the survey from which the economic data comes was affected by the “extraordinary challenges of the pandemic,” producing

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By Susan Heavey

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. median household income hit a record high in 2019 and the poverty rate fell, according to a government survey released on Tuesday that offered a snapshot of the economy before millions of American jobs were destroyed by the coronavirus pandemic.

Census officials cautioned, however, that the COVID-19 outbreak impacted their data collection, which was conducted after lockdowns this year, and may have skewed the results.

“Given data-collection challenges during the pandemic, we are concerned about bias in the 2019 estimate,” agency officials wrote in a separate blog post https://www.census.gov/library/stories/2020/09/was-household-income-the-highest-ever-in-2019.html and paper https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/working-papers/2020/demo/sehsd-wp2020-10.pdf, explaining that lower income and minority household response to the survey dropped.

The U.S. Census Bureau said real median household income jumped 6.8% from $64,324 in 2018 to $68,703 last year – the highest since the agency began tracking the data in 1967.

It also said the nation’s poverty rate fell

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. median household income hit a record high in 2019 and the poverty rate fell, according to a government survey released on Tuesday that offered a snapshot of the economy before millions of American jobs were destroyed by the coronavirus pandemic.

FILE PHOTO: Veterans and military personnel discuss job opportunities at a military job fair in Sandy, Utah, U.S., March 26, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey

The U.S. Census Bureau said real median household income jumped 6.8% from $64,324 in 2018 to $68,703 last year – the highest since the agency began tracking the data in 1967.

It also said the nation’s poverty rate fell last year to 10.5%, a 1.3-percentage-point drop. Another measure of poverty that adjusts for government aid programs for low-income Americans showed a drop to 11.7% last year from 12.8% in 2018.

At the same time, however, the number of people without health insurance for

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FILE PHOTO: Veterans and military personnel discuss job opportunities at a military job fair in Sandy, Utah, U.S., March 26, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. median household income rose again last year while the number of people in poverty continued to fall, according to government data on Tuesday that offered a snapshot of the economy before millions of American jobs were destroyed by the coronavirus pandemic.

The U.S. Census Bureau in an annual report said the 2019 median household income was $68,703 compared with $64,324 the prior year, a 6.8% increase — the highest since the agency began tracking the data in 1967.

It also found that the nation’s poverty rate fell last year to 10.5%, a 1.3-percentage-point drop from 11.8% in 2018. Another supplemental measure of poverty that adjusts for government aid programs for low-income Americans found the rate was 11.7% last year, down from 12.8% in

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