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  • A new CDC report shows that, as Arizona closed its bars and started enforcing more mask mandates over the summer, coronavirus infection rates in the state quickly tumbled.
  • It’s another good signal that masks, distancing, and avoiding crowds all work really well to prevent the spread of COVID-19.
  • The CDC said in its report that this “combination” approach of voluntary and mandatory disease-fighting measures “is more effective” than any one tactic taken on its own, and is especially important since we don’t have a good vaccine or treatment yet. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

Wear a mask and close the bars.

That’s the verdict from a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, out Tuesday, which highlights how these two actions — taken together — are critical to fighting COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

The report details how both bar closures and

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The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Committee (CDC) is going to postpone voting to figure out who will first receive the coronavirus vaccine on a priority basis, CNN reported.

The committee was supposed to conduct voting on Tuesday. CDC also planned to guide states on the distribution of vaccines across the US after voting.

According to a committee member William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the vote was delayed as the committee is still studying the issue.

Schaffner said as cited in the Wall Street Journal report: “The working group has not fully worked out its plan to present to Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) today, so the CDC has decided not to ask ACIP to vote today.”

Also read: India’s trials for Russia’s Sputnik-V vaccine could start in next few weeks

Schaffner also revealed that the group had agreed in

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  • The CDC on Friday acknowledged, for the first time, that the coronavirus can ‘remain suspended in the air.’
  • The new CDC guidance was swiftly retracted late Monday morning. The agency said “a draft version” had been “posted in error.” This has happened several times in recent months after the White House has taken issue with recommendations. 
  • The now-retracted phrasing lined up with studies from around the world that suggested the virus can float and linger between people through the air, especially indoors.
  • Being loud, by singing, shouting, talking, and spitting, can all help the virus spread better.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Six feet may not be enough to protect you from the coronavirus, especially indoors.

That’s what the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had said in updated guidance posted on its website Friday, in line with findings from studies around the world. 

But by Monday

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Should you get a coronavirus test? The official advice on how to answer that question seems to change by the day.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention angered many public-health experts in August when it changed its guidance to say that “you do not necessarily need a test” if you’ve been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for the virus. That went against what we know about the virus’ spread, since overwhelming evidence has shown that asymptomatic cases are a key part of coronavirus transmission.

Any recommendation not to test asymptomatic people “flies in the face of common sense and public health,” Dr. Leana Wen, a public-health professor at George Washington University, previously told Business Insider.

The CDC itself even estimates that asymptomatic cases represent around 40% of the nation’s COVID-19 infections. 

So on Friday, after nearly a month of vocal backlash, the guidance was rewritten

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Brett Kelman, USA TODAY
Published 10:05 a.m. ET Sept. 18, 2020 | Updated 10:29 a.m. ET Sept. 18, 2020

CLOSE

COVID-19 widespread testing is crucial to fighting the pandemic, but is there enough testing? The answer is in the positivity rates.

USA TODAY

The claim: The CDC removed all uses of ‘COVID-19 pandemic’ from its website because the virus was never actually a pandemic.

A meme that has been shared on Facebook says coronavirus is not a pandemic. As evidence, it claims the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has removed references to “the COVID-19 pandemic” from its website.

The posts include a screenshot of the CDC mobile homepage, which at the top says, “Coronavirus Disease 2019: CDC is responding to the novel coronavirus outbreak.”

The homepage of the mobile website for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Photo: Courtesy photo)

One Facebook user posted the meme along with

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A Covid-19 vaccine is not likely to be available to a larger population in the US before the late second quarter or third quarter of 2021, according to the director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Robert Redfield.

Redfield, at a Senate Appropriations subcommittee hearing on Wednesday, said that there will be very limited supply of the vaccine at the end of the year, the Wall Street Journal reported. In terms of distribution, high-risk individuals and frontline workers will be prioritised.

“If you’re asking me when is it going to be generally available to the American public, so we can begin to take advantage of vaccine to get back to our regular life, I think we’re probably looking at third, late second quarter, third quarter, 2021,” he said as quotes by the report.

Trump counter

The timeline was countered by the US President Donald Trump who said

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  • Bill Gates is not sugarcoating how he feels about the US coronavirus response: It is bad. 
  • He told STAT’s Helen Branswell that the US response to the virus has “been a mismanaged situation every step of the way,” and said: “it’s unbelievable — the fact that we would be among the worst in the world.”
  • “You have people at the White House who aren’t epidemiologists, you know, saying what a great job they’ve done,” Gates also told Bloomberg. “So it’s no longer a set of experts.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

Billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates is unafraid to tell you how he really feels about the US coronavirus response. And it’s not good. 

“It’s shocking,” he told STAT. “It’s unbelievable — the fact that we would be among the worst in the world.”

It’s a sentiment Gates has been been uttering for months now, but in the wake

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  • An email obtained by Politico shows a Trump political appointee accusing career scientists at the CDC of undermining the president’s messaging on COVID-19.
  • “CDC to me appears to be writing hit pieces on the administration,” Dr. Paul Alexander, a scientific advisor to agency spokesperson Michael Caputo, wrote in the Aug. 8 email.
  • Caputo and Alexander appear to have successfully delayed publication of a CDC report that recommended against using hydroxychloroquine, a malaria drug falsely touted by President Trump as a potential cure for COVID-19, Politico reported.
  • “Nothing to go out unless I read and agree with the findings… and I tweak it to ensure it is fair and balanced and ‘complete,'” Alexander said in the email.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Trump administration officials have sought to water down reports from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Politico reported Friday night, with one political appointee accusing

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  • Dr. Robert Redfield has been the director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since March 2018.
  • Earlier this week, Redfield asked governors to prepare state distribution facilities for coronavirus vaccines by November 1— two days before the presidential election.
  • His appointment was met with mixed reviews: Dr. Anthony Fauci once described Redfield as “a talented and committed physician/scientist.” Redfield has also faced controversy over the misrepresentation of data for a clinical trial for an AIDS vaccine during his role as one of the leading AIDS researchers at the US Army.
  • In August, he walked back from CDC’s modification of testing guidelines to no longer encourage asymptomatic people to get tested to clarify everybody who wants a test can get one after drawing much criticism from public health and medical experts.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Earlier this week, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Happy Thursday and welcome back to On The Money. I’m Sylvan Lane, and here’s your nightly guide to everything affecting your bills, bank account and bottom line.



Nancy Pelosi wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: On The Money: Mnuchin, Pelosi reach informal deal to avoid government shutdown | Trump eviction ban tests limits of CDC authority | Initial jobless claims hit 881,000; unadjusted claims tick up


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On The Money: Mnuchin, Pelosi reach informal deal to avoid government shutdown | Trump eviction ban tests limits of CDC authority | Initial jobless claims hit 881,000; unadjusted claims tick up

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THE BIG DEAL-Mnuchin, Pelosi reach informal deal to avoid government shutdown: Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) have informally agreed to pursue a short-term stopgap measure to avert a government shutdown at the end

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