In what will perhaps go down as the toughest period in India’s aviation history, the country’s two listed airlines, Indigo Airlines and SpiceJet, posted huge losses in the June 2020 quarter. IndiGo’s consolidated loss of ₹2,844 crore was its highest ever, while SpiceJet’s consolidated loss of ₹601 crore was among the largest it has posted so far. This is in stark contrast to the profits of ₹1,203 crore posted by IndiGo and ₹263 crore by SpiceJet in the year-ago period. SpiceJet reported its Q1 numbers on September 15 while IndiGo declared its Q1 numbers on July 29.

SpiceJet’s losses in the June quarter would have been higher by ₹141 crore, had it not accounted for ‘other income’ towards claims of reimbursement from Boeing for the grounding of its MAX aircraft.

The spread of Covid-19 and the consequent lockdown on flights meant that both SpiceJet and IndiGo flew passengers for just

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J.D. Power 2020 U.S. Business Wireless Satisfaction Study (Graphic: Business Wire)

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J.D. Power 2020 U.S. Business Wireless Satisfaction Study (Graphic: Business Wire)

TROY, Mich.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Oct 8, 2020–

In March of 2020, as virtually every aspect of routine business was disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic, one critical piece of technology kept the world connected without interruption or slowdown: the mobile phone. Accordingly, business wireless customers have responded with the highest-ever customer satisfaction scores for wireless carriers in the J.D. Power 2020 U.S. Business Wireless Satisfaction Study, SM released today. However, as deferred billing that amassed under the Keep America Connected pledge comes due, some of these high scores may be compromised.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201008005020/en/

J.D. Power 2020 U.S. Business Wireless Satisfaction Study (Graphic: Business Wire)

“Wireless has been a lifeline for business customers during the pandemic, and

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Despite the looming threat of furloughs for the airline industry set to begin at the end of this week, American Airlines CEO Doug Parker said Sunday that he is still hopeful Congress will reach an agreement on a new round of coronavirus stimulus that would provide aid to the nation’s air carriers.

“There’s enormous bipartisan support for it. We have Republicans, Democrats, the administration all saying — knowing that this is the right program, that it makes sense, that indeed it should be extended because airline employees provide critical infrastructure,” Parker told CBS’ Face the Nation. “We have everyone putting us in every bill they have, we just need the bills to be laws. We need laws, not bills. That’s what we’re going to do and I’m actually confident we can get it done.”

U.S. AIRLINES MAKE URGENT

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CAMBRIDGE — Letter carrier Bob Tremarche, a 38-year veteran of the US Postal Service, said he’s recently found himself trying to reassure people on his route through East Cambridge.

They’ve been worried, he said. Will their mail-in ballots get to the city on time? Will their medication be delivered quickly?

And amid a national conversation about the postal service, Tremarche said he and other letter carriers have their own concerns about the funding and support of their agency. So on Sunday morning, a few dozen letter carriers, union officials, and supporters stood in front of the ornate Post Office building near Central Square in Cambridge to rally for postal workers.

“We thought we need our voices to be heard,” Tremarche said. “We appreciate all the protests and rallies that have gone on around the country. But most of us here are postal employees who are working here in Cambridge, and

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“We will deliver the nation’s election mail on time and within our well-established service standards,” DeJoy said, vowing at least a temporary halt to what he called “operational initiatives” that triggered the most alarm. 

“It’s good he’s tapping the brakes,” said David Grosskopf, president of the National Association of Letter Carriers in Western New York branch three, representing about 1,400 members.

Still, Grosskopf said the Postal Service in the past few months disconnected five letter barcoding machines from its distribution center on William Street, machines that sort letters sent on to individual stations.

Those decisions, he said, only elevate the pressure on clerks and carriers to keep up – sometimes unsuccessfully – with pandemic deliveries that include such household necessities as checks and prescriptions.

Grosskopf said his focus is the longterm well-being of carriers and other employees, part of what he describes as an increasingly besieged operating chain that brings

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