With the House’s scheduled recess approaching on Friday, fresh hope has materialized, in the form of new and apparently serious talks between Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. Ms. Pelosi has agreed to reduce the size of a new bill to $2.2 trillion, which is still above the $1.5 trillion figure Mr. Mnuchin favors but $1.2 trillion less than the House called for back in May. It also happens to be about the amount of fiscal injection likely required to put the economy back on its pre-pandemic growth trajectory within two years, according to the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. Mr. Mnuchin and Ms. Pelosi have agreed to continued talks, even as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), whose GOP-led chamber only mustered a $500 billion bill, dourly noted that the sides are “very, very far apart.”

No doubt there are still major sticking points, including

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a group of people standing in front of a store: Ohio Secretary of Frank LaRose speaks on Sept. 25, 2020 at the Columbus Distributing Company in Columbus.


© Andrew J. Tobias, cleveland.com/cleveland.com/TNS
Ohio Secretary of Frank LaRose speaks on Sept. 25, 2020 at the Columbus Distributing Company in Columbus.

Fight night: All eyes will be on Ohio Tuesday as Republican President Donald Trump and Democratic former Vice President Joe Biden share a Cleveland stage for their first debate. Seth Richardson has a primer with all you need to know, including what’s at stake for the candidates and what issues will – and probably won’t — come up. And Peter Krouse takes a closer look at the logistics, and what the closely watched event will mean for Cleveland.

No profit sharing: Throughout the debate about whether to repeal House Bill 6 1/4 u2032s $1.3 billion bailout of two nuclear power plants, one key question remains unanswered: How profitable or unprofitable are the plants? As Jeremy Pelzer found, Energy Harbor, the plants’ owner, still refuses to

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Under pressure: State Rep. Dave Greenspan is “Representative 7,” the unnamed public official federal agents have described as meeting with the FBI as former House speaker Larry Householder pressured him via text message to vote for House Bill 6, Andrew Tobias reports. Tobias obtained the texts between Householder (now under indictment) and Greenspan, referenced in federal court records, via a public records request. Greenspan, who’s now co-sponsoring an HB6 repeal bill, declined to discuss his role in the investigation, but said in a statement: “We are elected and entrusted with the welfare of our constituents. That should always be our primary focus.”

Peace and quiet: Republican Sen. Rob Portman broke with Republican President Donald Trump on Thursday after the president declined to say he would accept the results of the election and commit to a peaceful transition if he loses, Seth Richardson reports. In a tweet, Portman

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Capping days of commemorations of her extraordinary life, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg becomes the first woman in American history to lie in state in the U.S. Capitol.

also will be the first Jewish-American to lie in state and just the second Supreme Court justice. The first, Chief Justice William Howard Taft, also had been president.

Ginsburg’s casket will be brought to the Capitol Friday morning for a private ceremony in Statuary Hall attended by her family and lawmakers, and with musical selections from one of Ginsburg’s favorite opera singers, mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves. and his wife, Jill, planned to attend.

Members of the House and Senate who are not invited to the ceremony because of space limitations imposed by the coronavirus pandemic will be able to pay their respects before a motorcade carrying Ginsburg’s casket departs the Capitol early afternoon.

The honor of lying in state

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No thank you: Dr. Joan Duvwe, who backed out of the Ohio Department of Health director job last week, explained that she turned sour toward the opportunity when she learned of the harassment her predecessor, Dr. Amy Acton, experienced. The president of Ohio Right to Life, however, said Duvwe had no chance of getting confirmed by the Senate after knowledge became public that she worked for Planned Parenthood in the 1980s, Andrew Tobias and Laura Hancock report.

Unlimited apps: The Ohio Democratic Party got a legal victory on Friday, after a Franklin County judge ruled state officials must allow voters to apply for absentee ballots electronically, Tobias writes. Common Pleas Judge Stephen L. McIntosh, a Democrat, ruled state law only says a voter must fill out a form and deliver it, and doesn’t specify how it must be delivered. So, he ordered state elections officials to allow

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Measuring Cupp: Jeremy Pelzer has a profile of Bob Cupp, the quiet but experienced new Ohio House speaker. Included is what’s on Cupp’s priority list through the end of the year (potentially repealing House Bill 6, passing a long-sought education-funding reform bill) and what’s not (Gov. Mike DeWine’s gun-reform package).

Mail time: More than 1 million Ohioans have requested absentee ballots by mail, a figure that’s already approaching the total 1.2 million mail-in votes cast for the November 2016 election, Andrew Tobias reports. Six counties — Athens, Lucas, Portage, Summit, Trumbull and Wayne, have already exceeded their 2016 totals. Five more counties, Franklin, Hamilton, Lorain, Sandusky and Wood, were at 90% or more of their 2016 totals.

Return to sender: In his capacity as top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee, U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan on Tuesday sent its Democratic chairman, Jerry Nadler of New York, a

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The rubber hits the road: President Donald Trump on Wednesday urged his Twitter followers to boycott Akron-based Goodyear Tire & Rubber for not allowing employees to wear political attire – namely MAGA hats, Robin Goist reports. Goodyear says it asks associates to “refrain from workplace expressions in support of political campaigning for any candidate or political party, as well as similar forms of advocacy that fall outside the scope of racial justice and equity issues.”

Who said it? Ohio Democrats including U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown condemned Trump for attacking an American company that employs thousands of Ohioans. Republicans were much more tight-lipped, with Rep. Anthony Gonzalez the only one to address Trump’s boycott call directly. In an interview with WSPD-AM in Toledo, Gov. Mike DeWine said he did not expect Trump to say it again – which the president did only several hours later. Sen. Rob Portman’s

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