FILE PHOTO: World Bank Group President David Malpass attends a news conference after a meeting at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany October 1, 2019. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke

BERLIN (Reuters) – The COVID-19 pandemic could trigger a debt crisis in some countries, so investors must be ready for granting some form of relief that could also include debt cancellation, World Bank President David Malpass was quoted as saying on Sunday.

“It is evident that some countries are unable to repay the debt they have taken on. We must therefore also reduce the debt level. This can be called debt relief or cancellation,” Malpass told Handelsblatt business daily in an interview.

“It is important that the amount of debt is reduced by restructuring,” Malpass added.

He pointed to similar steps in previous financial crises such as in Latin America and the so-called HIPC initiative for highly indebted countries in the 1990s.

Rich countries

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BERLIN (Reuters) – The COVID-19 pandemic could trigger a debt crisis in some countries, so investors must be ready for granting some form of relief that could also include debt cancellation, World Bank President David Malpass was quoted as saying on Sunday.

“It is evident that some countries are unable to repay the debt they have taken on. We must therefore also reduce the debt level. This can be called debt relief or cancellation,” Malpass told Handelsblatt business daily in an interview.

“It is important that the amount of debt is reduced by restructuring,” Malpass added.

He pointed to similar steps in previous financial crises such as in Latin America and the so-called HIPC initiative for highly indebted countries in the 1990s.

Rich countries last month backed an extension of the G20’s Debt Service Suspension Initiative (DSSI), approved in April to help developing nations survive the coronavirus pandemic, which has

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If you know of Sherry and Chris Howard through their State Fair of Texas concessions business, you might think their motto is “Go big or go home.” But if you learn more about their family and their Scrumbscious Burgers and Pieshakes restaurant in Forney, you’ll find they know how to go big and go home.

Their big family has been a key to their success in good times as well as more challenging times. In fact, it was their family that led them into the food business in the first place.

Staring down a recession, the couple brainstormed ideas for Sherry, a stay-at-home mother of six, to bring in some additional income. They decided to sell pies out of their home, and with a website Chris built to fuel the business, they launched the sweet venture in 2007.

By the next year, demand had grown so much they moved into

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Yet a growing number of analysts and insiders are reaching a startling conclusion: While the NFL and its sky-high viewership may be critical to networks as marketers look to unleash their budgets on holiday shoppers, the scrapping of the college Division I football season actually might come with as many silver linings as drawbacks — maybe even more.

“They can’t come out and say it because they don’t want to offend the schools. But I think there are a lot of people at these networks who aren’t crying about a possible canceled season in the fall,” said Neil Begley, an analyst at Moody’s who tracks television sports and speaks regularly with that industry’s executives. “The games cost a lot of money, and you don’t know if the ad dollars will be there.”

The idea upends common wisdom about the pandemic, which holds that cancellations of any kind are bad for

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With US passports virtually useless and coronavirus cases spiking in various parts of the country, many Americans are postponing or canceling their travel plans. 

While airlines have been more flexible than usual with allowing customers to change their reservations, they are still sitting on billions of dollars.

When it became clear that air travel was going to be on the decline for the foreseeable future, the Transportation Department said “any airline operating in the US, foreign or domestic, had to refund tickets for flights the airline canceled and couldn’t offer an alternative without a “substantial” schedule change,” as reported in the Wall Street Journal.

Many airlines have placed the responsibility on consumers if they want to change their plans, which can be altered online, but if they want a monetary refund it can be hard 

Below is a look at what the major US Airlines are doing in the case

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