Employees sometimes get unhappy with their companies. Pay and benefits used to be top concerns, but now social justice issues have emerged as major issues. Employees at the software company New Relic have vented about the CEO’s politics and his wife’s political contributions. What should a company do when workers object over political issues?

The local newspaper in Portland, where the company’s tech employees work, reports “The conflict has been amplified by CEO Lew Cirne’s large donation to a private Christian school that excludes gay students and opposes gay rights. He has also donated money to a controversial evangelist who proselytizes to Jews. Cirne’s wife is a contributor to President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign, another sore point for many New Relic employees even though

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  • Samsung cancelled a review of its US ad-buying business in August due to the economic effects of the pandemic, according to several people with knowledge of the matter.
  • Four of the five major ad agency holding companies were pitching for the business, which Publicis Groupe has had since 2007.
  • According to research firm Comvergence, Samsung spent around $845 million on advertising in the US last year.
  • Samsung did not respond to a request for comment.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Samsung cancelled a competitive review of its US digital ad and media-buying business due to economic uncertainty caused by the coronavirus, several people with direct knowledge of the matter said.

A person close to the business said Samsung wanted to focus on its core business of selling smartphones and other personal electronics during the second half of 2020 instead of spending time and money to review its advertising.

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It’s different, Davis said, than say Chick-fil-A, which faced boycotts because its owners contributed to anti-gay marriage groups. In that instance, it is the company’s own action that is targeted, he said.

Davis also points out that the NRA affiliate boycott was quick and took effect almost immediately.

Davis noted that nothing is really private anymore within a company.

“No email can’t be forwarded,” he said. “It’s easier to gather evidence of an abusive supervisor or harassment.”

“There’s a high level of transparency that we haven’t had before,” Davis said.

A recent example of that was a public apology from Wells Fargo CEO Charlie Scharf after an internal memo he wrote was leaked outside the company. In the June memo, Scharf blamed the lack of diversity at the bank on “a very limited pool of Black talent to recruit from.”

There’s also a sense, Davis said, that what companies do

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United Airlines  (UAL) – Get Report and its pilots reached an agreement that canceled 2,850 furloughs that had been scheduled for this week, the pilots’ union said Monday.

Shares of the Chicago airline at last check were up 5.5% to $36.07.

The Air Line Pilots Association said it voted to approve the Pandemic Recovery Letter of Agreement with United Airlines management. The accord prevents any United pilot from being furloughed at least until June. 

The agreement keeps all 13,000 United pilots employed.

The deal also offers a second round of early-separation options for all pilots age 50+ with 10 years of experience. And it reduces or terminates the effect of temporary work reductions based on a recovery in passenger demand or other market factors, the union said.

The agreement was ratified by about 58% of the pilots who voted on it.

“Our members understood that in order to

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(Bloomberg) — Kioxia Holdings Corp., the memory chipmaker spun out of Toshiba Corp. in 2018, will cancel its current initial public offering plan to list its shares on the Tokyo Stock Exchange, the Nikkei Business magazine reported.



a circuit board: A Toshiba Corp. logo is seen on a controller chip in an arranged photograph in Tokyo, Japan, on Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017. Under pressure from its banks,Toshiba is racing to resolve several final disagreements withWestern Digital Corp.before it can complete a deal to sell its chips business to the U.S. company and other investorsby the end of August, according to people familiar with the matter.


© Bloomberg
A Toshiba Corp. logo is seen on a controller chip in an arranged photograph in Tokyo, Japan, on Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017. Under pressure from its banks,Toshiba is racing to resolve several final disagreements withWestern Digital Corp.before it can complete a deal to sell its chips business to the U.S. company and other investorsby the end of August, according to people familiar with the matter.

The chipmaker decided not to go ahead as of now because a deepening of political tensions between the U.S. and China is expected to sharply weigh on its profitability, the report said, without saying where it got the information.

A Kioxia spokesperson couldn’t immediately comment on

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Will President Donald Trump cancel your student loans?

Here’s what you need to know—and what could happen next.

Student Loans

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) have made an offer to Trump—right before the presidential election—that would empower him to cancel up to $50,000 of student loan debt for each borrower in the U.S. Warren and Schumer argue that student loan forgiveness would stimulate the economy, reduce inequality and lower income disparity. Warren has argued that a president—through the Secretary of Education—has the power to cancel student loan debt under the Higher Education Act. However, others argue that only Congress has the power to cancel student loans. According to the latest student loan debt statistics, there is approximately $1.6 trillion of outstanding student loan debt, more than 90% of which federal student

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American Airlines  (AAL) – Get Report is preparing to discontinue as many as 30 routes to two dozen medium and small cities due to the coronavirus pandemic, a media report said.

The Fort Worth, Texas, carrier received nearly $6 billion in federal aid under a $25 billion package Congress passed this year to prop up the airline industry. 

As part of the rescue, American was required to maintain minimum levels of service through Sept. 30, with layoffs also prohibited through the end of the third quarter. 

An executive at the airline told CNBC of the plan to discontinue the routes. The changes the executive discussed with CNBC might not take effect until after that date. 

U.S. airline labor unions and executives have been lobbying Congress for another $25 billion in taxpayer aid. That’s meant to last the industry through the end of next March as it struggles with

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