Supporters and opponents of Colorado’s statewide ballot measures have pumped $41.7 million just this year toward swaying public opinion on issues that could have far-reaching implications if passed in November.

During a presidential election year in which issues such as abortion access hang in the balance, and at a time when many families are struggling to make ends financially, Colorado’s ballot questions are taking on heightened importance. Measures such as a 22-week ban on abortions and having Colorado support the national popular vote for president are receiving attention — and contributions — from across the state and country. With less than a month to go, advocates are making their final pushes to Election Day — including in the money race.

The committee fighting the proposed ban on abortions after 22 weeks has brought in the most contributions of any issue committee at almost $6.5 million in 2019 and 2020, while

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STEVE LeBLANC,

AP

September 27, 2020 | 9:38 AM

BOSTON (AP) — Money, and a lot of it, is pouring into campaigns for the two questions on the November ballot in Massachusetts.

A look at both referendums and the cash being spent around them:

RIGHT TO REPAIR

By far, most of the money has been raised by supporters and opponents of Question 1, which would expand the state’s “Right to Repair” law by giving car owners and independent auto repair shops expanded access to mechanical data related to vehicle maintenance and repair.

Collectively, the two groups have pulled in more than $41.5 million, according to reports filed with the state Office of Campaign and Political Finance.

Supporters of the question — the Massachusetts Right to Repair Committee — have raised about $15.7 million. Donors include auto parts suppliers and The Coalition for Auto Repair Equality, a non-profit national organization

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Updated

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By STEVE LeBLANC, Associated Press

BOSTON (AP) — Money, and a lot of it, is pouring into campaigns for the two questions on the November ballot in Massachusetts.

A look at both referendums and the cash being spent around them:

By far, most of the money has been raised by supporters and opponents of Question 1, which would expand the state’s “Right to Repair” law by giving car owners and independent auto repair shops expanded access to mechanical data related to vehicle maintenance and repair.

Collectively, the two groups have pulled in more than $41.5 million, according to reports filed with the state Office of Campaign and Political Finance.

Supporters of the question — the Massachusetts Right to Repair Committee — have raised about $15.7 million. Donors include auto parts suppliers and The Coalition for Auto Repair Equality, a non-profit national organization that represents companies like NAPA, AutoZone and Advance

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Maxwell is the owner of eMaximize, a full-service digital marketing agency located in Manhattan Beach, California.

Running Google Ads campaigns is getting more and more complicated. Gone are the days when a savvy business owner could easily run their own ads and their business. Google has introduced so much complexity and automation to the Google Ads platform that you risk spending a lot of money without a favorable ROI if you do not know what you are doing.

Having managed Google Ads campaigns for over 12 years, I have seen this advertising platform add more and more functionality. Some of the features are extremely valuable, while others you should probably shy away from unless you are an experienced pay-per-click analyst.

Here are five ways to optimize your Google Ads campaigns to increase conversions and help deliver a favorable ROI.

1. Don’t Allow Advertising On Search Partners’ Sites

When

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