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By Roger Bales and Martha Conklin

Many of California’s 33 million acres of forests face widespread threats stemming from past management choices. Today the U.S. Forest Service estimates that of the 20 million acres it manages in California, 6-9 million acres need to be restored.

Forest restoration basically means removing the less fire-resistant smaller trees and returning to a forest with larger trees that are widely spaced. These stewardship projects require partnerships across the many interests who benefit from healthy forests, to help bring innovative financing to this huge challenge.

The California Wildfires in Photos

california wildfires

We are engineers who work on many natural resource challenges, including forest management. We’re encouraged to see California and other western states striving to use forest management to reduce the risk of high-severity wildfire.

But there are major bottlenecks. They include scarce resources and limited engagement between forest managers and many local, regional and state

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Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Second Chance: providing hope for 25 years

For 25 years, the purple house at 1933 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Way in Newtown, has welcomed the underserved of Sarasota and surrounding areas. Hungry citizens in crisis know they can find food, personal care items and new-baby supplies there.

Most important, these individuals find hope. No one wants to wait in line for a handout, so April Glasco, founder and CEO of Second Chance Last Opportunity, offers Life Skills Training to anyone who wants to turn their life around. Formerly delivered in person, these lessons are now available via Zoom.

Second Chance Last Opportunity never intended to serve as a food pantry, but with COVID-19 and the resulting job losses, Glasco and her army of volunteers stepped up to provide food distributions every Wednesday and Friday.

As the only emergency center in Newtown, Second Chance and Glasco provide the

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OAKLAND, Calif. — California has launched the nation’s first mandate on reopening that requires local officials to control the coronavirus in their most impoverished communities before easing business restrictions across their entire county.



a group of people sitting at a table in front of a building: Patrons eat at table set up on a sidewalk in Burbank, Calif.


© AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez
Patrons eat at table set up on a sidewalk in Burbank, Calif.

The approach is aimed at tackling a persistent inequity in California, where low-income people of color have disproportionately struggled to avoid contracting the disease.

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“If you believe in growth and you don’t believe in inclusion, then we’re going to leave a lot of people behind,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said this week. “And one of the things we value as a state is inclusion, and we believe that we’re all better off when we’re all better off.”

The Covid-19 pandemic has laid stark the health disparities that have long existed, with poor, Black, Latino, Pacific Islander and Native communities

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Companies have long moved sales and customer-service jobs to cheaper cities like Phoenix. But they have been more reluctant to do so in areas like software engineering and management, figuring that proximity to the talent, research universities and venture capital in the tech epicenter outweighed the higher cost of labor.

Even before the pandemic, there were indications that that was starting to shift. Silicon Valley companies were increasingly putting jobs in engineering hubs in cities like Austin, Texas, and Toronto. Now they have an opportunity to run a remote-working experiment on a scale that wouldn’t have otherwise been tried.

Google and Facebook have said they will allow employees to work remotely until 2021. Stripe, a payments company, recently announced that it would pay employees $20,000 to leave the Bay Area if they accepted a salary reduction of up to 10 percent based on the cost of living wherever they went.

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By JOHN ROGERS, Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California’s first-of-its-kind state program to fund stem-cell research is running out of money and supporters want voters to provide a $5.5 billion infusion.

The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has doled out nearly $3 billion for research since the non-profit was created in a 2004 ballot question supported by 59% of voters. New stem-cell labs were created around the state and grants were awarded to Stanford University, the University of California, Berkeley, and other prominent institutions.

In the years since, clinical studies have been launched to determine how stem cells might treat a variety of diseases, including Alzheimer’s, cancer and Parkinson’s, as well as such conditions as spinal paralysis and auto-immune deficiencies.

Proposition 14’s supporters are hoping voters will again support the program, although some acknowledge that with the state caught in a pandemic-infused economic crisis it’s hard to guess how

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — California’s first-of-its-kind state program to fund stem-cell research is running out of money and supporters want voters to provide a $5.5 billion infusion.



FILE - In this March 16, 2012, file photo, researcher Terry Storm works in a stem cell research lab at the Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building on the Stanford University campus in Palo Alto, Calif. The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has doled out nearly $3 billion for stem-cell research since 2004. Now, with the institute running out of money, its advocates are asking California voters to approve Proposition 14, to give it a $5.5 billion cash infusion. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this March 16, 2012, file photo, researcher Terry Storm works in a stem cell research lab at the Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building on the Stanford University campus in Palo Alto, Calif. The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has doled out nearly $3 billion for stem-cell research since 2004. Now, with the institute running out of money, its advocates are asking California voters to approve Proposition 14, to give it a $5.5 billion cash infusion. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)

The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has doled out nearly $3 billion for research since the non-profit was created in a 2004 ballot question supported by 59% of voters. New stem-cell labs were created

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One of the clear injustices of California’s court system is that suspects — not convicted but accused — are stuck in jail awaiting trial because they could not afford bail.

This upends the very American ideal of innocent until proved guilty. A person accused of a crime who can’t make bail may well lose his or her job and means of supporting a family, along with future job prospects, no matter how the trial ends.

“It’s unsafe, it’s unfair and it’s unjust,” said Assemblyman Rob Bonta, D-Alameda, one of the legislative proponents of Senate Bill 10 to replace money bail with a system that would determine a suspect’s release on an assessment of risk of flight and threat to the community. Sen. Bob Hertzberg, D-Los Angeles, has called the legislation “ground zero in the fight over criminal justice reform.”

The bill cleared the Democratic-controlled Legislature by large margins and was

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Had anyone guessed then who might succeed Koepka as PGA champion come 2020, they reasonably might have scanned that PGA leader board from Koepka himself all the way down to the cut victims. But for keen soothsaying, they should have looked indoors at Berkeley, amid the caps and gowns and episodic rowdiness, among the graduates headed to firms like Barclays and Accenture, where a student speaker quoted Jay-Z: “I’m not a businessman; I’m a business, man.”

Well, if that isn’t the next PGA Championship winner right there on video, the guy who will start a U.S. Open at Winged Foot at 8:07 a.m. on a Thursday in September 2020 with fellow PGA winners Tiger Woods and Justin Thomas. Here he comes in a black cap and gown and a yellow Cal stole and a pink lei, 30 minutes into the introductions of graduates, up the little stairs, right behind his

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Michael Volpatt already knew what art, medicine and clothes he needed to take when he got an alert to evacuate his home west of Guerneville in Sonoma County ahead of the massive LNU Complex Fire. But there was one more decision to make — should he go to his store, Big Bottom Market, and try to prepare it for what could be a weeks-long evacuation?

“It’s a big decision to have to make because you don’t know what’s going to happen,” he said. “Is your building going to burn down? Is it going to matter? Is the electricity going to go out and all your food spoil?”

Volpatt decided it wasn’t worth the risk and left the store to its fate. The power held and most of the products in his shop, best known for its Oprah-approved biscuits, survived. But the 10-day evacuation and an unusually early and ferocious start

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Los Angeles Times readers might think the first night of the Republican National Convention was nothing more than a non-stop attack on California. In its coverage of the first evening’s events, the paper posted the headline “RNC speakers paint California as a dangerous dystopia.” Missing from the report were rebuttals to the claims made by the speakers. Maybe that’s because it’s too difficult to deny the truth.

For the record, California is not a dystopia for all. A very thin slice of the 39 million in the state is quite wealthy and comfortable. These elites can root on the riots in radical-chic fashion because they are insulated from their consequences. They’re happy to condemn economic inequality while standing behind the policies and policymakers that have created and exacerbated the disparities. And they have no need to bother their own thoughts about the effects of a political environment that is driving

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