If you’re a low-income resident of California with a new solar panel on your apartment-building roof and extra money in your pocket, you might have Chanel to thank.



a view of a city: An aerial view of Casitas del Valle in Moreno Valley, Calif., a Sunrun solar panel project similar to of the ones financed by Chanel's $35-million investment that aims to provide solar access to about 30,000 low-income Californians over the next several years. (Sunrun)


© (Sunrun)
An aerial view of Casitas del Valle in Moreno Valley, Calif., a Sunrun solar panel project similar to of the ones financed by Chanel’s $35-million investment that aims to provide solar access to about 30,000 low-income Californians over the next several years. (Sunrun)

That’s because the French luxury label that’s the go-to for celebrities around the world (including Tilda Swinton at the recent Venice Film Festival and Shira Haas and Julia Garner at Sunday night’s Emmy Awards) announced Wednesday that it is investing $35 million with San Francisco-based Sunrun, the largest rooftop solar installer in the U.S., aimed at bringing solar power to 100 multifamily properties across the Golden State.

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“That will be for about 30,000 low-income residents,”

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Worries about the coronavirus and support for continuing and even increasing state and local restrictions are highest among the state’s poor and communities of color, while concerns are far lower among white residents and the better-off, according to a new poll.

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With less than two weeks left in the California 2020 Legislative Session, state legislators have introduced bills to increase personal income tax on the highest earners and create a wealth tax that the bill’s sponsor said could still be collected from residents who flee the state.

“As a heads-up to my colleagues proposing the Wealth Tax Act, the U.S. Constitution is still in force here,” Assemblyman Kevin Kiley, R-Rocklin, said. “You can’t keep taxing people after they flee the state.”

AB 1253, with several cosponsors, would increase the top earners’ income tax from 13.3 percent to 16.8 percent and make the tax retroactive to Jan. 1.

If passed, high-income earners would pay an additional 1 percent on income over $1.18 million, another 3 percent on income over $2.36 million, and 3.5 percent on income over $5.9 million. The rates also would include inflation adjustments so that taxpayers pay more.

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