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DETROIT – The Better Business Bureau is warning consumers about an online shopping scam involving “going out of business” advertisements.

Melanie Duquesnel, president of the Better Business Bureau serving Eastern Michigan, said the difficulty they’re finding is that clients are not getting the product but yet they’re getting charged for it.

READ: Scammers use multiple methods to target victims — Here’s what to watch out for

“Just because an advertisement is on Facebook doesn’t mean that it’s a 100% trustworthy business,” Duquesnel said.

The BBB recommends doing your research before you buy anything online, search a company to see if others have complained, look up reviews and always pay with a credit card, that way if there is a problem you can dispute the charges.

With more people buying cars, RVs and boats online, the BBB says vehicle shipper and escrow scams are going up.

According to the BBB,

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Always ask questions before hiring a contractor.

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The Better Business Bureau on Thursday issued an alert warning Missourians not to enter into a business deal with Missouri Fence Company-Springfield LLC, owned by Republic resident Justin Schmidt, without exercising caution.

The BBB reported that over the summer, multiple consumers sent complaints that Missouri Fence Company failed to start projects, didn’t issue refunds when services weren’t rendered and offered poor customer service.

For example, a woman living in Clever told BBB she gave Schmidt’s company a $4,800 down payment in March. Schmidt never built her a fence, BBB said.

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The now-defunct Springfield location of Missouri Fence Company was photographed on Oct. 1, 2020. The Better Business Bureau issued an alert warning consumers to exercise caution when working with the company, which the BBB says did not always perform services or issue refunds when requested. (Photo: Gregory Holman/Springfield News-Leader)

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Coveted 2020 Pinnacle Award Recognizes the Organization for Exemplary Practices and Service

HOUSTON, Oct. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Next Level Urgent Care, LLC is among the select 2020 organizations recognized by the Better Business Bureau (BBB) for excellence in the marketplace, an honor reserved for exemplary businesses serving as role models for their character, expertise and commitment to quality and trust.

The award, which is selected by a designated board of judges, the Silver Fox Advisors, recognizes only a small number of businesses each year. Nominees are considered for two levels of awards – a Winner of Distinction and a Pinnacle Winner.  Business practices and approach, as described by each organization, are reviewed and scored.

The winners were recently announced and celebrated online in lieu of the October luncheon cancelled amid the COVID pandemic. Next Level Urgent Care was recognized with the 2020 Pinnacle Award, a top honor among

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For Springfield resident Debi Thieman, a one-ounce pot of DermaFil beauty cream turned out to be a derma-fail — after an online vendor selling the stuff started clawing extra money out of her bank account a month after she made a payment to the company.



a person holding a camera: Debi Thieman paid for what she though was a "trial" container of DermaFil online in August but a month later was $89.87.


© Nathan Papes/Springfield News-Leader
Debi Thieman paid for what she though was a “trial” container of DermaFil online in August but a month later was $89.87.

“It’s supposed to improve your skin,” Thieman, 63, told the News-Leader on Wednesday. “It’s supposed to be like a magic formula.”

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But, she said, DermaFil doesn’t work any better than the skin creams she typically buys from Walmart.

She bought the DermaFil product because it was advertised on Facebook, Thieman said. In August she willingly paid two bank charges, one for $6.87, one for 21 cents, for what she thought was a “trial” container of DermaFil. But

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Debi Thieman paid about $7 for what she thought was a “trial” container of a beauty cream, DermaFil, advertised on Facebook. A month later, DermaFil debited her bank account for an extra $89.87. (Photo: Nathan Papes/Springfield News-Leader)

For Springfield resident Debi Thieman, a one-ounce pot of DermaFil beauty cream turned out to be a derma-fail — after an online vendor selling the stuff started clawing extra money out of her bank account a month after she made a payment to the company.

“It’s supposed to improve your skin,” Thieman, 63, told the News-Leader on Wednesday. “It’s supposed to be like a magic formula.”

But, she said, DermaFil doesn’t work any better than the skin creams she typically buys from Walmart.

She bought the DermaFil product because it was advertised on Facebook, Thieman said. In August she willingly paid two bank charges, one for $6.87, one for 21

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Before the COVID-19 pandemic, North Texan households were probably seeing larger paychecks, according to data released this week by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The data comes from the American Community Survey. The Census Bureau noted that the information was collected before the pandemic, so it doesn’t reflect the outbreak’s blow to businesses across the country.

“American Community Survey estimates serve as ‘America’s mirror’ by providing a detailed look at how communities are changing and what must be done to meet the unique needs of their residents,” Donna Daily, chief of the American Community Survey Office, said in a written statement.

In the North Texas metropolitan area, which includes Dallas, Fort Worth and Arlington, median household income was $66,000, according to the 2019 data. That was up from $60,000 for the survey’s 2017 data.

The increase in North Texas fell in line with the national trend. National median household income was

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The nationwide need for rental assistance looms large right now, and while there are legitimate relief programs out there, now comes a warning about a fake COVID-19 grant circulating on Facebook.

The Facebook message “grant” that promises thousands of dollars and appears to come from a friend is being called a scam by the Better Business Bureau.

Here is how the scam works. You get a message on Facebook Messenger or Instagram direct message that looks like it comes from someone you know.

The message tells you about a grant for COVID-19 relief.

The sender may claim to have already applied and received thousands of dollars, but it is not true.

RELATED: Fake ‘mask exemption cards’ circulate on social media

Scammers are either hacking social media accounts or creating separate lookalike profiles of people you know to fool you.

These con artists are banking that you will trust a message

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The Torch Awards for Ethics Competition to reward businesses that have adapted during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Better Business Bureau Serving North Central Texas is now accepting applications for its annual Torch Awards for Ethics Competition.

This competition is free to enter and is open to businesses and nonprofit organizations in 29 North Texas counties. 

The Better Business Bureau is asking applicants and nominators to detail any special efforts made to adapt to the COVID-19 crisis.

Businesses do not have to be accredited with the Better Business Bureau to participate or win. 

Winners are featured on BBB’s website and provided a winners’ logo for display in marketing and advertising. 

The award was created by the BBB Institute for Marketplace Trust in 1996.

The Torch Awards recognize businesses and nonprofit organizations that demonstrate a commitment to ethical practices and social responsibility in corporate leadership, communications and management. 

Past winners and information

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TUCSON, Ariz. — The Better Business Bureau released a warning for parents to help keep kids safe and information secure.

While Americans continue to deal with the pandemic, there is one change that millions of families are managing every day — and that’s a life of work and school online.

BBB spokesperson Sean Herdrick says adults have to keep a closer eye on what’s happening online especially with more kids logged on throughout the day. He says kids are more vulnerable and clicking on a simple link can do a lot of damage.

“What it unknowingly does is it opens up all of that information that you have stored whether its payment or private information that you really don’t want out there,” Herdrick said.

The BBB also says you should:

  • Watch out for new social media accounts
  • Beware of contest and giveaways
  • Pay attention to apps and file sharing sites
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