The Chicago Bulls unveiled a new mural on the exterior of the Advocate Center last week, featuring the words “Black Lives Matter” large enough for everyone passing West Madison Street to see.



a group of people riding motorcycles on a city street: Black Lives Matter mural in front of the Bulls training facility, Advocate Center, in Chicago, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020.


© Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Black Lives Matter mural in front of the Bulls training facility, Advocate Center, in Chicago, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020.

The artwork, which hangs alongside the team’s six championship banners and retired numbers, includes a few pieces of Bulls history, including a 1996 championship shirt and ’97 championship ring.

The mural was created by artist Langston Allston, who currently is based in New Orleans but still has connections and family in Chicago that bring him back frequently. During a phone interview with the Tribune, Allston discussed his process for creating this mural, his involvement in the Movement for Black Lives through artwork and using art as a tool for optimism even as

Read More

In a remarkable turnabout, coffee futures have become the commodity trading vehicle of choice for a growing number of managed funds. Indeed, its increasing popularity has given coffee prices a much-needed dose of price momentum, making it one of this summer’s hottest commodities. But a growing body of data suggests that the bulls won’t be able to maintain control of the java market much longer. Here we’ll review the fundamental and technical evidence which points to potentially lower prices ahead.

A major catalyst behind coffee’s recent price gains is the growing number of hedge funds playing the long side of the market. This can be clearly discerned in the latest Commitments of Traders (COT) reports from the CFTC. It shows that non-commercial traders (including hedge funds and institutions) have dramatically increased their long positions in coffee futures in recent weeks, while covering prior short positions.

Commenting on the increase in

Read More

The bulls seems to be riding the positive momentum as the September futures contract of nickel on Multi Commodity Exchange (MCX) continues to post gains. The contract has been consistently making higher highs and during the final week of August, it broke out of the important level of ₹1,125 following a consolidation phase. The price action in the daily chart looks steady and the price can be expected to rise further.

Substantiating the positive outlook, the daily relative strength indicator is moving up along with the contract and the slope remains positive. But the moving average convergence divergence indicator in the daily chart remains flattish. Nevertheless, it remains in the bullish zone. Moreover, since the contract is trading above the 21-day moving average, the outlook remains positive and if at all there is a minor correction, the price level of ₹1,125 can act as a solid cushion.

Considering the above

Read More

By Rodrigo Campos

NEW YORK (Reuters) – As U.S. stocks hit record highs, some investors are betting the market’s future gains will be increasingly driven by some of its lesser-loved companies.

Value stocks – shares of economically sensitive companies trading at multiples that are usually below those found on growth names – have been among the laggards in the market’s blistering rally from its March lows.

Some investors believe the relative cheapness of value stocks, which include energy companies, banks and industrial conglomerates, will catapult them to leadership if the nascent U.S. economic revival gains momentum, shifting focus from the big technology-related stocks that have led markets during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Russell 1000 Value index trades at almost 18 times earnings, up from 14 a year ago, and is up some 45% since late March. By comparison, the Russell 1000 Growth index trades at a multiple of 31, up

Read More

By Rodrigo Campos

Loading...

Load Error

NEW YORK, Aug 28 (Reuters) – As U.S. stocks hit record highs, some investors are betting the market’s future gains will be increasingly driven by some of its lesser-loved companies.

Value stocks – shares of economically sensitive companies trading at multiples that are usually below those found on growth names – have been among the laggards in the market’s blistering rally from its March lows.

Some investors believe the relative cheapness of value stocks, which include energy companies, banks and industrial conglomerates, will catapult them to leadership if the nascent U.S. economic revival gains momentum, shifting focus from the big technology-related stocks that have led markets during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Russell 1000 Value index trades at almost 18 times earnings, up from 14 a year ago, and is up some 45% since late March. By comparison, the Russell 1000 Growth index trades at a

Read More

NEW YORK — As U.S. stocks hit record highs, some investors are betting the market’s future gains will be increasingly driven by some of its lesser-loved companies.

Value stocks – shares of economically sensitive companies trading at multiples that are usually below those found on growth names – have been among the laggards in the market’s blistering rally from its March lows.

Some investors believe the relative cheapness of value stocks, which include energy companies, banks and industrial conglomerates, will catapult them to leadership if the nascent U.S. economic revival gains momentum, shifting focus from the big technology-related stocks that have led markets during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Russell 1000 Value index trades at almost 18 times earnings, up from 14 a year ago, and is up some 45% since late March. By comparison, the Russell 1000 Growth index trades at a multiple of 31, up from 22, and has

Read More

(Bloomberg) — The clock is ticking on the dollar’s long-enduring bull cycle.

After nine years of strength, the currency is being assailed from all sides. This year, the Federal Reserve joined other central banks in slashing interest rates to rock-bottom levels, wiping out the dollar’s advantage vis-à-vis the euro and yen. Ballooning debt and deficits have eroded foreign investment in the U.S. And trade-weighted measures suggest the dollar’s decline is overdue.

For the doomsayers, they finally herald the beginning of the end. It’s reminiscent of previous turning points in 1985 and 2002, when abrupt policy shifts upended the dollar and ushered in protracted periods of weakness. Now, a bleaker growth outlook in the U.S. compared with Europe could hasten the reversal. It’s little wonder the greenback has slumped to a two-year low following its worst month in a decade, and traders — on a net basis — are shorting it

Read More