For many Americans across the country, the prospect of getting a second stimulus check from the government is a matter of life or death. With millions of people out of work due to layoffs and cuts caused by the coronavirus pandemic, many households have been forced to depend on government aid to help pay for basic needs, including food, housing and essential bills. 

But instead of elected officials helping those in need, many critics say, politicians are playing games with their lives.

Last week in a series of tweets, President Trump called on Congress to pass additional coronavirus relief measures. It was a stunning reversal after he’d announced just hours earlier that he was calling off negotiations until after the November election.

“The House & Senate should IMMEDIATELY Approve 25 Billion Dollars for Airline Payroll Support, & 135 Billion Dollars for Paycheck Protection Program for Small Business,” Trump tweeted on

Read More

The world of wealth- and investment-technology can be a wonky, crowded space, full of entrants trying to find new solutions for old financial problems, clamoring for advisers’, clients’, and big firms’ attention.

Like other corners of the fintech market, wealth-tech startups have reported fresh infusions of capital this year even as the coronavirus pandemic has threatened financial stability around the world.

Last quarter, wealth-tech startups raised $1.2 billion in venture funding, up from $450 million during the first quarter, according to a report from CB Insights. Total deal activity ticked up slightly from quarter to quarter, from 28 to 32 deals.

Business Insider asked investors to nominate early-stage startups in the wealth management ecosystem that they see as up-and-comers. We set a criteria that companies eligible for this list could be in and outside of investors’ portfolios, while sticking with startups that have not raised beyond a Series B round … Read More

(Bloomberg) — America’s economic rebound is about to get a lot tougher after an initial series of gains from the depths of the pandemic.

Applications for regular state unemployment benefits continue to number more than 800,000 each week and chances in Congress diminished for additional support for the jobless and businesses on Thursday. What’s more, funding for the temporary supplemental jobless benefit payments authorized by President Donald Trump in early August is running out.



a screenshot of text: Applications for jobless benefits continue to number in hundreds of thousands


© Bloomberg
Applications for jobless benefits continue to number in hundreds of thousands

With the help of fiscal stimulus — from aid for small businesses to an extra $600 a week in jobless benefits — the U.S. economy has rebounded faster than many economists expected. Sustaining a robust pace, however, could prove challenging given the elevated unemployment rate, absence of additional government support and persistent spread of the coronavirus.

Loading...

Load Error

The recovery right now is

Read More

LANSING, MI — Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said she won’t be “bullied” into prematurely opening businesses, like movie theaters, bowling alleys and gyms.

Representatives for businesses that remain closed five-plus months after being ordered to shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic say they just want a chance to prove they can operate safely.

Managers and owners of a pandemic-shuttered family fun center, bowling alley, dance studio, nonprofit YMCA, banquet hall and ice rink appeared before a legislative committee in Lansing Wednesday, Aug. 26. They asked Whitmer to reopen on some level.

Several of the respective businesses said they’ve created in-depth plans to safely reopen, including guidelines for social distancing and sanitation.

To date, Whitmer’s guidelines for reopening various sectors have been vague, some say.

“I’m going to follow the science, I’m going to work with Dr. (Joneigh) Khaldun,” Whitmer said at a press conference Tuesday. “But we are looking

Read More



Mark Meadows, Steven Mnuchin are posing for a picture: White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speak to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on August 6, 2020. Mnuchin said on Thursday there's still "a handful of very big issues" that House Democrats and Senate Republicans need to negotiate before securing a deal for a second federal relief package.


© Samuel Corum/Stringer
White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speak to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on August 6, 2020. Mnuchin said on Thursday there’s still “a handful of very big issues” that House Democrats and Senate Republicans need to negotiate before securing a deal for a second federal relief package.

Negotiations over a second economic relief bill are continuing in Washington, but Senate Republicans and House Democrats are making little progress toward a deal anytime soon.

“There’s a handful of very big issues that we are still very far apart,” Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said Thursday.

Mnuchin has met with White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer all week in hopes of securing an agreement between both sides before the traditional August recess, which was scheduled to begin Friday.

HEROES vs.

Read More