JPMorgan Chase unexpectedly grew its bottom line last quarter as the bank’s Wall Street business continued to shine and its Main Street arm withstood turmoil in the US economy.



a group of people riding on the back of a bicycle: Pedestrian pass in front of a JPMorgan Chase & Co. bank branch in the Midwood neighborhood in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said a recent uptick of coronavirus cases in south Brooklyn and Queens neighborhoods requires "urgent action," including stepped-up testing, education and enforcement. Photographer: Amir Hamja/Bloomberg via Getty Images


© Amir Hamja/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Pedestrian pass in front of a JPMorgan Chase & Co. bank branch in the Midwood neighborhood in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said a recent uptick of coronavirus cases in south Brooklyn and Queens neighborhoods requires “urgent action,” including stepped-up testing, education and enforcement. Photographer: Amir Hamja/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The nation’s largest bank blew away expectations by reporting a profit of $9.4 billion during the third quarter, up 4% from the year before. Per-share profit jumped to $2.92, easily topping estimates.

Loading...

Load Error

JPMorgan’s big beat was driven by strong trading and investment banking performance as well as far fewer credit losses

Read More

Author Mark Schwartz reveals a new and empowering playbook for business and technology leaders to turn bureaucracy into a powerful tool

PORTLAND, Oregon, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — IT Revolution, the industry leader for advancing DevOps, today announced its newest book, The (Delicate) Art of Bureaucracy: Digital Transformation with the Monkey, the Razor, and the Sumo Wrestler. Paperback, eBook and Audio editions are available October 13. To order, visit: (https://itrevolution.com/delicate-art-of-bureaucracy/). 

Authored by Mark Schwartz, Enterprise Strategist at Amazon Web Services (AWS), The (Delicate) Art of Bureaucracy presents humor, history, and real-life examples from his days as a government bureaucrat. Schwartz puts forth a one-of-a-kind playbook to show technology and business leaders how to wield bureaucracy as a superpower and bust through it at the same time.

“People are really good at creating bureaucracy, so we find it everywhere. The only way we can accomplish large-scale

Read More

This report analyzes[1] market cap, economic book value, and price-to-economic book value (PEBV) ratio for the S&P 500 and each of its sectors.

I analyze other fundamental and valuation metrics for the S&P 500 and its sectors in these reports:

These reports leverage cutting-edge technology to provide clients with a cleaner and more comprehensive view of every measure of profits[2]. Investors armed with my firm’s research enjoy a differentiated and more informed view of the fundamentals and valuations of companies and sectors.

S&P 500 PEBV Ratio Jumps to Highest Level Since September 2018

The PEBV ratio for the S&P 500 rose from 1.1 at the end of 2019 to 1.7 through 2Q20, or its highest level since mid-2018, and one of the highest levels since 2004. See Figure 1. This ratio measures the level of expectations for future profits compared to

Read More

At 42 years, Jason English has already had a career that, for most of us, would constitute a lifetime of achievement. The South African entrepreneur and business magnate has launched and scaled some of the most innovative businesses in South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the UAE, along with a great deal of philanthropy in South Africa.

We sat down with the young business leader to reflect on a career punctuated  by adrenaline and adventure, building the virtual reality start-up The Virtulab, and writing about how companies might create and embody a compelling company culture in his upcoming book “The Oros Effect.”

Jason English South Africa Dubai CG Tech
Jason English South Africa Dubai CG Tech

Jason English

Jason English. You are a member of YPO, a global leadership community of chief executives and influential business leaders, but you started your career as an engineer spanning many different industries. When you look back, how do you connect

Read More



a close up of a sign: A magnifying glass zooms in on the Occidental Petroleum (OXY) website.


© Source: Pavel Kapysh / Shutterstock.com
A magnifying glass zooms in on the Occidental Petroleum (OXY) website.

Occidental Petroleum (NYSE:OXY) stock is down 16% in the past month and even over 75% in the year-to-date. OXY stock is wavering at 70% of its estimated $14.05 common stock tangible book value per share (TBVPS).




a close up of a screen: A magnifying glass zooms in on the Occidental Petroleum (OXY) website.


© Provided by InvestorPlace
A magnifying glass zooms in on the Occidental Petroleum (OXY) website.

Click to Enlarge

It’s likely that OXY stock will drift further down if oil does not rebound and if its TBVPS deteriorates. But in the near to long term, I believe that OXY stock will move higher as economic mobility increases.

In addition, as Covid-19 vaccines start to slow down the spread of the pandemic in 2021, the price of oil should rise. This will slowly push up OXY stock

Essentially, then, now is a good time to accumulate the

Read More



Read More

Since I wrote my book The Million-Dollar, One-Person Business, many entrepreneurs have asked me if publishing their own book will help them take their business to the next level. Some hope it will attract new business or speaking opportunities. Others want it to become the basis for a new product, such as a course.

I usually tell them it depends.

A book can be very helpful in growing a business, but not always. Before you dive in, it’s important to give it serious thought. Writing and polishing book requires more time and effort than most people think, whether you work with a commercial publisher or self-publish. As an entrepreneur, you’ve got to balance that against other demands on your time—like running your business. 

Read More

U.S. stock indexes closed higher Wednesday, but booked their worst month since March, as hopes faded for another round of fiscal stimulus from Washington ahead of November’s election.

Market participants also were wary of a potentially contested November result following Tuesday’s rancorous first presidential debate.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average
DJIA,
+1.19%

rose 329.04 points, or 1.2%, to close at 27,781.70, while the S&P 500 index
SPX,
+0.82%

gained 27.53 points, 0.8%, to end at 3,363. The Nasdaq Composite
COMP,
+0.74%

finished 0.7%, or 82.26 points higher, at 11,167.51.

For the month, the Dow closed 2.3% lower, the S&P 500 down 3.9% and the Nasdaq Composite ended off 5.2%, marking the first monthly decline for each benchmark since March which saw the low point of the sell off resulting from the coronavirus pandemic.

On a quarterly basis, the Dow advanced 7.6%, the S&P 500 rose 8.5% and the Nasdaq Composite

Read More

Donald Trump repeatedly discussed with advisers the idea of naming his daughter Ivanka as his running mate in 2016 before settling for Mike Pence, according to a former Trump campaign aide who became a star witness in Special Counsel Robert Muellers investigation.

Rick Gates, who in the summer of 2016 was Trump’s deputy campaign chairman, describes in a new book, ‘How Trump — wary of the Never Trump sentiment’ in the Republican party and still stinging from his competitors attacks during the GOP primary — deliberated for about a month on a vice presidential candidate he could trust completely.

During a V-P discussion that included Jared and the other kids all assembled in one room, Trump said, “I think it should be Ivanka. What about Ivanka as my V-P? There was silence, Gates writes in Wicked Game: An Insiders Story on How Trump Won, Mueller Failed and America Lost, referring

Read More

  • A draft memo that President Donald Trump composed laying out his reasons for firing FBI Director James Comey was “tinfoil helmet material,” a former member of the special counsel Robert Mueller’s team said.
  • That’s according to “Where Law Ends,” an upcoming memoir by Andrew Weissmann, who worked on Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.
  • Weissmann wrote in his book that James Quarles, another prosecutor on the team, described Trump’s draft memo as “tinfoil helmet material” in June 2017.
  • “I read the document immediately, while Jim stood over my desk,” Weissmann said, referring to the draft memo. “It was excruciatingly juvenile, disorganized, and brimming with spite — incoherent and narcissistic. You could almost feel the spittle coming off the paper.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A former prosecutor on the special counsel Robert Mueller’s team described a memo that President Donald Trump drafted laying out his

Read More