BMW Motorrad India has launched the refreshed and reworked entry motorcycle twins — G 310 R and the G 310 GS — giving them new looks and features, including a BS6-compliant power plant. Produced on a separate assembly line by cooperation partner TVS Motor Company at its Hosur plant, the motorcycles are the smallest displacement bikes made by the BMW Motorrad brand anywhere in the world.

The first global launch was in 2015 in India and the bikes have since been introduced in many other markets too. The prices at launch were considered to be a bit high at the time of its first launch. BMW Motorrad has had that corrected now with price tags of ₹2.45 lakh and ₹2.85 lakh for the G 310 R and the G 310 GS respectively (both ex-showroom). These are nearly ₹60,000 lower than the BS IV variants, making these the most affordable Motorrad

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Fresh off its license win in London, Uber Technologies (NYSE: UBER) is looking to further expand its presence in Europe by buying the Your Now ride-hailing joint venture of BMW (OTC: BAMXF) and Daimler (OTC: DMLRY), according to a report on Monday by Bloomberg.

The automakers have been trying to find investors in the business so they can focus more fully on their core car operations, but the coronavirus pandemic has thwarted their efforts thus far. Daimler valued the ridesharing business at $720 million in June, Bloomberg said.

Uber driver with passengers

Image source: Uber Technologies.

An acquisition of Your Now would allow Uber to penetrate deeper into Europe at a time when it is shedding minority stakes in businesses in various countries, including Asian ridesharing app Grab, and the similar business of Russian tech conglomerate Yandex, though it will still own a 19% stake in Yandex when the business is spun off.

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By David Shepardson and Mohammad Zargham

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – BMW AG

and two U.S. subsidiaries agreed Thursday to pay an $18 million U.S. fine to resolve accusations that they disclosed misleading information about the German luxury automaker’s retail sales volume in the United States while raising approximately $18 billion from investors in corporate bond offerings.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said from 2015 to 2019, BMW inflated reported U.S. retail sales, which helped BMW close the gap between actual retail sales volume and internal targets and “publicly maintain a leading retail sales position relative to other premium automotive companies.”

It added BMW of North America “maintained a reserve of unreported retail vehicle sales — referred to internally as the ‘bank’ — that it used to meet internal monthly sales targets without regard to when the underlying sales occurred.”

The SEC probe started in late 2019, BMW said.

“There is

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BMW will pay an $18 million fine to settle allegations that it inflated its monthly U.S. sales numbers for five straight years.

The Securities and Exchange Commission said Thursday that the German luxury automaker kept a reserve of unreported sales that it drew on to meet monthly targets from 2015 to 2019.

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BMW disclosed the misleading information while raising about $18 billion in several corporate bond offerings, the agency said.

“Companies accessing U.S. markets to raise capital have an obligation to provide accurate information to investors,” Stephanie Avakian, the SEC’s Enforcement Division director, said in a statement.

The actions helped BMW maintain a leading retail sales position among other luxury automakers, the agency said.

BMW of North America also improperly adjusted its sales reporting calendar in 2015 and

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All’s well that ends well for Jon Rahm. But not without a lot of drama and a little angst. The 25-year-old Spaniard had shot the low round of the BMW Championship through 54 holes, a four-under 66 on Saturday at difficult Olympia Fields. However, it included a penalty stroke he had to give himself after somehow forgetting to mark his ball when he picked it up the fifth green.

“I just hope I don’t lose by one,” Rahm said after his round Saturday, sitting three off the lead of Dustin Johnson and Hideki Matsuyama with 18 holes remaining. “I’m just going to say that. I just hope. And if I do, well, very well my fault. It’s as simple as that.”

Rahm then tried to made sure the mental error didn’t cost him the tournament, shooting an even lower six-under 64 on Sunday, But when Johnson birdied the 18th hole

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