BTS members dance in the music video “Dynamite”
  • Korea’s Big Hit Entertainment, which manages K-pop idol band BTS, priced its upcoming IPO at the top of its anticipated range and was swamped by investor demand.
  • The offering, which priced at 135,000 won ($115) a share, was 1,117 times oversubscribed, according to a regulatory filing on Monday.
  • Big Hit will list on Seoul’s KOSPI index in early October
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Big Hit Entertainment, the agency behind South Korean boyband BTS, has priced its upcoming initial public offering at the top of its anticipated range, having been flooded with prospective investors on Monday. 

The company, headed by CEO Bang Si Hyuk, priced its upcoming initial public offering (IPO) at the very top of its indicative range of 105,000-135,000 won ($115) a share, it said in a regulatory filing on Monday

Big Hit manages a

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Ocado is enjoying a third year as one of the FTSE 100’s blockbuster stocks. 

Shares in the business doubled in 2018, rose more than 60 per cent in 2019 and are up around 80 per cent so far this year. 

Since the Covid-19 outbreak and lockdown, investors have watched the online grocery market notch up years of growth in a matter of months. 



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At its last outing, Ocado’s UK grocer business reported £1billion half-year sales for the first time. Ocado was also the fastest growing supermarket in the three months to August, according to data company Kantar, with business up 45.5 per cent on a year earlier. 

Ocado’s breakneck expansion provides a glimmer of hope for Marks & Spencer, which started selling 6,000 of its products on the online grocer’s website on September 1. 

Next week’s

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(Bloomberg Businessweek) — As Christmas 2018 approached, workers at Activision Blizzard Inc. were busy doing what they always do—writing code, modeling characters, and designing landscapes for the next Call of Duty games. At the company’s campus in Santa Monica, Calif., everyone got hand-delivered invitations to the annual holiday bash, where staff could drink, unwind, and celebrate the year. Some recipients, though, were soon told they’d received the invitations by mistake and wouldn’t be welcome at the party, according to three people familiar with the incident. The reason: They were temporary contractors officially employed by a staffing agency, Volt Workforce Solutions.



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That treatment isn’t unusual in the gaming industry. While executives rake in millions of dollars and some full-time employees can expect Porsche-size bonuses when a hot

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