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President Donald Trump after his release from the hospital for treatment of coronavirus told Americans to not “be afraid of it.” But for those who are suffering the effects of the illness after getting sick, it’s tough not to be dominated by it. (Oct. 9)

AP Domestic

Mark Schultz has been hit on both sides of this pandemic. 

For six months it was his Oshkosh bar and restaurant, both of which are closed for now after being hammered under state coronavirus restrictions.

Now it is Schultz himself, infected with COVID-19, lying in a hospital intensive care unit, laboring to breathe, unsure of when — or whether — he’ll go home.

“I don’t worry much about me, but I got a 10-year-old son and my fiancée — that’s all I care about,” he said through tears. “My family is all at home. They are all worried about me. I don’t

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Now is not a good time to be actively investing in small-cap U.S. stocks. That’s because small-caps typically lag their larger counterparts during the fourth quarter.

Take a look at the accompanying chart, which plots the average monthly return advantage that the smallest stocks have over the largest. (The exact definitions of these two hypothetical portfolios are provided on the website maintained by Dartmouth College professor Ken French.)



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Notice that the small-cap advantage is heavily concentrated in January, and then declines from February through the end of the year. By the fourth quarter, it not only has completely disappeared but actually become a disadvantage. Notice also that this tendency exists in U.S. election years.

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Is tax-selling the cause?

To be sure, you shouldn’t bet on a stock-market pattern continuing unless there is a plausible explanation for why it exists. 

In the case of

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White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said that unlike in Britain and Europe, there are no concerns over stock markets in the U.S.

“There’s some worries that Britain might shut down,” he told reporters at the White House on Monday. “It’s coming out of London. I can’t verify it. It’s not my job, but I read the reports like everybody else and I think that’s a great concern.”

“The USA is in a much better position, thankfully. We’ve regained control of the virus, both the cases and the fatalities,” he added. “But I think people are worried about Britain, and maybe the rest of Europe as well.”

The U.K. economy was one of the major economies hit hardest by the coronavirus pandemic. According to the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development, the U.K.’s GDP saw a 20.4 percent decline between April to June.

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When the U.K.

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Claiming that “systemic racism” is to blame for a lack of “economic parity,” more than three dozen live television musicians have signed an open letter to the TV networks calling for parity with their colleagues – actors, writers and directors – in the area of wages, health care contributions and residuals payments on streaming platforms.

Signers include John Baptiste, the bandleader for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert; Eli Brueggemann, music director for Saturday Night Live; and Paul Mirkovich, musical director for the house band on The Voice.

The letter states that during contract negotiations earlier this month between the broadcast networks and the American Federation of Musicians, “Your companies acknowledged that live television musicians are the only sector of the industry exhibiting substantial racial diversity, but at the bargaining table we are told that our contributions are worth less than those of actors, writers, and directors, even though we

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If your small business died in the last six months, blame Trump. If your small business is suffering, blame Trump. It wasn’t COVID-19.

Mnuchin open to restarting talks with Pelosi

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President Donald Trump could have rescued American small businesses, but he didn’t. And this week, he could help save hundreds of thousands more if he took action, but he won’t.

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I’ve been closely monitoring what has – and has not – been done for small businesses since the start of the pandemic. And at virtually every turn, Trump and his administration ignored the needs of small business or actually made it harder for them to survive. Moreover, his continuing refusal to develop a national policy and coordinated response to the pandemic has turned what could have been a limited shutdown into a long, lingering economic disaster. The worse may be yet to come.

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Rhonda Abrams, Special to USA TODAY
Published 3:09 p.m. ET Sept. 9, 2020

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Pressed by Democrats to quickly negotiate a new coronavirus relief package, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the administration remains willing to work on a bipartisan agreement to aid small businesses, the unemployed, and schools. (Sept. 1)

AP Domestic

If your small business died in the last six months, blame Trump. If your small business is suffering, blame Trump. It wasn’t COVID-19.

President Donald Trump could have rescued American small businesses, but he didn’t. And this week, he could help save hundreds of thousands more if he took action, but he won’t.

I’ve been closely monitoring what has – and has not – been done for small businesses since the start of the pandemic. And at virtually every turn, Trump and his administration ignored the needs of small business or actually made it harder for them to

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Google has stated that while it does not object to there being a news media bargaining code, it disagrees with the one that has been proposed.

“Just to be clear — Google does not object to the idea of an Australian Code to oversee relationships between news businesses and digital platform,” it said in its latest blog post published on Monday.

“We have already made agreements to pay publishers for content through a licencing program and several Australian publishers have come on board.

“But what we don’t agree with is a law that’s totally unworkable from a product and business perspective. We know that many voices have called for changes to the current draft law.”

Google went on to explain how it currently “supports” and does not “use” nor steal news content.

“We link you to [stories], just like we link you to every other page on the web —

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  • White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Thursday avoided assigning direct blame to Russia for the poisoning of Putin’s top opponent, Alexei Navalny.
  • Russia has a long history of attacking dissidents. 
  • Other world leaders have explicitly demanded an explanation from the Russian government, and Biden directly blamed the Kremlin for Navalny’s poisoning.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Thursday decried the poisoning of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny as “reprehensible” but declined to assign direct blame for the incident to the Russian government or Russian President Vladimir Putin. 

McEnany said the Trump administration was “deeply troubled” by Germany’s announcement on Wednesday that the nerve agent Novichok was found in Navalny’s system. Novichok has been used to poison other Russian dissidents. 

But she did not explicitly blame the Kremlin for the nerve-agent attack, instead saying that the administration would work to hold “those

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Sex workers and other content creators who use the OnlyFans platform to support their livelihoods are now blaming actress Bella Thorne for terms of service changes that include payment caps and holds.

The changes came after a number of people reportedly asked for refunds when Thorne charged $200 for a “naked” photo where she was not nude, according to The Los Angeles Times. Thorne, who posted on her own accounts that she did not offer nudity, told the Times the screenshot alleging the offering circulating on social media was falsified.

Content creators say the subscription service subsequently imposed payment caps of $50 on pay-per-view posts and a hold on payments that would force some international creators to wait 30 days to receive their money.

OnlyFans users who earn a significant portion of their income on the platform are blaming Thorne for the newly implemented policies now limiting their ability to

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Who’s to blame for the damage done to North Carolina’s small businesses during this year’s pandemic-induced recession?

In a Republican-sponsored roundtable Tuesday, a handful of small business owners in Charlotte pointed a finger at Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper.

And in a virtual roundtable, Democrats and other business owners blamed President Donald Trump.

The dueling events came amid a general election campaign when both men face tough re-election campaigns. And they spotlighted the problems that small businesses face five months into the lockdowns and other restrictions triggered by the coronavirus pandemic.

Through Aug. 9, revenue for Mecklenburg County’s small businesses had fallen nearly 26% this year, according to the Opportunity Insights Economic Tracker. Statewide it was down more than 12%.

“We’re losing the small-business character of Charlotte,” said restaurant owner Anthony Kearey.

Kearey joined state GOP Chair Michael Whatley, hotel owner Vinay Patel, small business owner Sonja Nichols, a candidate for

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