What happened

Charlotte’s Web Holdings (OTC: CWBHF) slumped by 3.4% on Tuesday. The cannabidiol (CBD) products specialist reported earlier in the day that one of its board members, Shane Hoyne, has resigned. The move was effective that day; he added that he will not stand for reelection at the company’s annual general meeting slated to take place on Thursday.

Charlotte’s Web did not provide a reason or reasons for his departure.

Dropper of cannabis derivative liquid in front of several plants.

Image source: Getty Images.

So what

Hoyne doesn’t seem to have been a pivotal figure as a director. It’s likely that investors are more worried about the lack of confidence his move might indicate about the company’s prospects. Or, for that matter, the CBD market specifically, or even the wider marijuana industry in general.

While board departures haven’t been exactly regular in corporate cannabis, there have been more than a few of them over the past year or so.

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PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Calling it an “historic opportunity” to jumpstart the City’s economy in the wake of COVID while also offering unprecedented job and investment opportunities for Black and Brown communities, a coalition of leading minority business, civic and faith leaders today urged the Delaware River Waterfront Commission and the City to select the Philadelphia 76ers’ plan to redevelop the Penn’s Landing waterfront.” data-reactid=”13″PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Calling it an “historic opportunity” to jumpstart the City’s economy in the wake of COVID while also offering unprecedented job and investment opportunities

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“Right off the coast of Portland,” said Hewitt.

Hewitt said the bluefin measured 112 inches long and weighed about 800 pounds.

Hewitt caught the tuna with his friend, Max Bogdanovich, 19, who lives in Scarborough, Maine.

Hewitt and Bogdanovich recently graduated from Cushing Academy, and they both love fishing.

They were on Bogdanovich’s lobster boat, which is named the Bogsea, when Hewitt hooked the tuna.

Max “was driving the boat to avoid it from snapping the line,” said Hewitt. “It’s a team process.”

Hewitt said it took “a little bit over two hours” to reel the tuna in.

“We didn’t realize how big it was until we tried to get it into the boat,” he said.

They had to get two people on a different boat to help them land the tuna, which they later sold.

Hewitt said the fish had to be weighed and dressed, and as of Tuesday

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It’s been just over a year since the 181 CEOs affiliated with the Business Roundtable (BR) signed a letter agreeing that from that moment forward, executives need to think about how their companies can benefit all stakeholders with a mission of purpose: customers, employees, suppliers, local communities and shareholders.

“The American dream is alive, but fraying,” said Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and the Business Roundtable’s chairman, in an August 2019 public statement. “Major employers are investing in their workers and communities because they know it is the only way to be successful over the long term. These modernized principles reflect the business community’s unwavering commitment to continue to push for an economy that serves all Americans.”

We’re in a much different world than we were 12 months ago, and in a recent survey that the Harris Poll and Just Capital completed, 90 percent of

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  • A video tweet from over the weekend showing long lines at the U-Haul in Manhattan went viral on Saturday, prompting a conversation about the number of people who are fleeing the city.
  • We visited that same U-Haul two days after the tweet was posted to ask people waiting in line if they were moving out of New York City.
  • The line on Monday was unsurprisingly shorter than the tweet depicted, but of the seven people we spoke to, only three people — including a couple and an actor — were planning to leave the city.
  • Weekends in August are historically known to be busy moving times during the year, but according to a study by Redfin, New York City had the highest number of people looking for property in other cities during the second quarter of 2020.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A video tweet from conservative news

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Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images


Tesla

is taking advantage of strong demand for electric-vehicle stocks and plans to raise billions in a nonstandard stock sale. On Tuesday, the EV behemoth said it plans to raise up to $5 billion in an “at the market” stock offering being led by

Goldman Sachs.

The company plans to use cash to “further strengthen our balance sheet, as well as for general corporate purposes,” according to the prospectus. That is standard language. More specifically, Tesla (ticker: TSLA) might use the money to build additional manufacturing capacity. Its next plant is planned for Austin, Texas. Currently, Tesla has facilities in California, Nevada, and Shanghai, as well as one under construction in Berlin. The company wasn’t immediately available to comment on future capacity plans.

The offering is a little different than other stock sales. “At the market” means “investors who purchase shares in this offering

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Why Consider SCHD?

With rates on bonds and CDs reaching low levels never seen in the long lives of today’s retirees, those needing income are turning to supposedly “safe” dividend stocks. This would incline many investors to choose a dividend ETF like Schwab’s U.S. Dividend Equity ETF (SCHD). Schwab’s website describes this ETF saying,

The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of the Dow Jones U.S. Dividend 100™ Index.

Tracks an index focused on the quality and sustainability of dividends. Invests in stocks selected for fundamental strength relative to their peers, based on financial ratios

This sounds attractive, especially to those who don’t have the time or inclination to do deep research into all the various dividend stocks available or who prefer to spread their risk by buying a basket of stocks rather than individual ones.

Those who have read

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Here in our mountain communities, small businesses are the lifeblood of our economy. The COVID-19 pandemic and resulting economic fallout has been hard on every single one of us and especially challenging for our small businesses and their employees. Too many people have lost their jobs and sadly too many businesses have shut their doors or are barely getting by.

Disagreements over aide for businesses and the unemployed have left Washington D.C. mired in gridlock, but the Colorado legislature stepped up. When we returned to the Capitol in Denver earlier this summer we put partisanship aside and passed several key bills that are going to help small businesses and workers across the state.

First we passed a bipartisan bill that created the Energize Colorado Gap Fund, which will provide more than $25 million in small business loans and grants for small businesses. The application for that fund opened on Monday.

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NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / September 1, 2020 / There are few entrepreneurs as unique as Gabriel Beltrán. From a young age, Gabriel has always been in touch with his commercial spirit. Today, he runs a successful dropshipping business through …

NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / September 1, 2020 / There are few entrepreneurs as unique as Gabriel Beltrán. From a young age, Gabriel has always been in touch with his commercial spirit. Today, he runs a successful dropshipping business through …

NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / September 1, 2020 / There are few entrepreneurs as unique as Gabriel Beltrán. From a young age, Gabriel has always been in touch with his commercial spirit. Today, he runs a successful dropshipping business through which he has achieved financial freedom.

“At the age of 9, I started selling cookies on the streets going door to door in the

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  • Startup founders are already under immense pressure to succeed in an industry where many fail, and fear they won’t be able to attract investors and talent if their personal struggles are revealed, some told Business Insider.
  • But they aren’t alone. A new survey of nearly 600 startup founders found that over three-quarters — 78% —  say their mental health has been suffering during the pandemic.
  • Two-thirds reported feelings of loneliness, while 60% percent said they had been overworking, and 38 percent said they had been drinking and using substances. 
  • “It should be no surprise that the mental health part of the crisis is real, and accelerating,” venture capitalist Brad Feld told us.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

In 2017, while running his startup Fresco News, John Meyer lost his father to suicide. Naturally, he was grief stricken. But as a 20-something, first-time CEO, he didn’t let it show.

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